United States Trade Deficit and the "New Economy" (ICPSR 1213)

Published: Jan 18, 2000 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Michael R. Pakko, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR01213.v1

Version V1

Amidst the overall strength and longevity of the United States economic expansion of the 1990s, a growing current account deficit is one indicator that often is viewed with concern. In this article, the author discusses some basic economic principles about current accounts and how they relate to the United States experience during the 1990s. He suggests that recent deficits should not be thought of as a source of weakness in an otherwise vigorous economy, but rather, that they are reflective of the same forces underlying recent economic strength.

Pakko, Michael R. United States Trade Deficit and the “New Economy.” Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2000-01-18. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR01213.v1

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Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

(1) The file submitted is 9909mp.xls, an Excel data file. (2) These data are part of ICPSR's Publication-Related Archive and are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigator(s) if further information is desired.

2000-01-18

2000-01-18

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Pakko, Michael R. United States Trade Deficit and the "New Economy". ICPSR01213-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2000-01-18. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR01213.v1

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