Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study (ICPSR 4701)

Version Date: Oct 4, 2012 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Ronald Angel, University of Texas-Austin. Population Research Center; Linda Burton, Pennsylvania State University. Population Research Institute; P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, University of Chicago. Population Research Center; Andrew Cherlin, Johns Hopkins University. Hopkins Population Center; Robert Moffitt, Johns Hopkins University. Hopkins Population Center

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04701.v7

Version V7

This data collection is the third wave of an intensive study in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio, which was initiated to assess the well-being of low-income children and families in the post-welfare reform era. The project investigates the strategies families have used to respond to reform, in terms of employment, schooling or other forms of training, residential mobility, and fertility. Central to this project is a focus on how these strategies affect children's lives, with an emphasis on their health and development as well as their need for, and use of, social services. For the first wave of the study, between March 1999 and December 1999, a random sample of approximately 2,400 households with children in low-income neighborhoods in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio were selected for interviews. Forty percent of the families interviewed were receiving cash welfare payments at the time of the interview. Each household had a child aged 0 to 4 or aged 10 to 14 at the time of the interview. The child and the child's primary female caregiver are the focus of the study. Extensive baseline information was gathered at the initial personal interview with the caregivers, tested younger children were assessed, and older children were interviewed. All interviews were conducted in-person using a computerized instrument. The third wave of data collection took place between February 2005 and January 2006, when the focal children were aged 5 to 10 or aged 15 to 20. Between May 2005 and May 2006, interviews were conducted with the teachers of the focal children.

Angel, Ronald, Burton, Linda, Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay, Cherlin, Andrew, and Moffitt, Robert. Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2012-10-04. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04701.v7

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United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (R01HD036093)

This data collection may not be used for any purpose other than statistical reporting and analysis. Use of these data to learn the identity of any person or establishment is prohibited. To protect respondent privacy, all data files in this collection are restricted from general dissemination. To obtain these restricted files, researchers must agree to the terms and conditions of a Restricted Data Use Agreement. Part 24 is enclave-only, and may only be accessed on-site at ICPSR.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
1999-03 -- 2006-05
1999-03 -- 2006-05

The teacher interview data are restricted and available only onsite through the ICPSR Data Enclave.

Between March 1999 and December 1999 a random sample of approximately 2,400 households with children in low-income neighborhoods in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio were interviewed. Forty percent of the families interviewed were receiving cash welfare payments at the time of the interview. Each household had a child aged 0 to 4 or aged 10 to 14 at the time of the interview.

Families with incomes less than 200 percent of the government poverty line living in Boston, San Antonio, and Chicago.

individual
survey data

2007-08-17

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Angel, Ronald, Linda Burton, P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, Andrew Cherlin, and Robert Moffitt. Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study. ICPSR04701-v7. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2009-02-10. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04701.v7

2012-10-04 The codebook and documentation for Parts 1, 2, and 3 were made restricted. The codebooks for Parts 5 and 6 were updated, specifically to revise the titles for each codebook.

2009-02-10 Added enclave-only data in the form of teacher surveys.

2008-10-13 SAS and Stata syntax files have been added that convert variable names in data files from previous waves to variable names that are consistent with the data files that ICPSR has released.

2008-07-31 Principal primary investigators provided variable construction documentation files for Wave 1 and Wave 2 data.

2008-07-08 Public and restricted versions are now available for Wave 1 and Wave 2.

2008-07-03 SPSS syntax files added that convert variable names in data files from previous waves to variable names that are consistent with the data files that ICPSR has released.

2007-11-06 Public versions are now available for the three restricted data versions previously released: Focal Child Interview Data, Continuing and New Caregiver Interview Data, and Separated Caregiver Interview Data. The primary investigator also deposited two datasets that include additional child age information detail.

2007-08-17 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Performed consistency checks.
  • Standardized missing values.
  • Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Notes

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. Please see version history for more details.
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This study was originally processed, archived, and disseminated by Data Sharing for Demographic Research (DSDR), a project funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).