Council Members, 2016-2018

In fall of 2015, six new members were elected to serve four-year terms on the ICPSR Governing Council starting in 2016, and Chandra Muller was appointed Council Chair. A list of previous Councils also is available on our website.

Name Term Institution Email
Christopher H. Achen, Past Chair 3/2016-2/2018 Princeton University achen@princeton.edu
Christine L. Borgman 3/2016-2/2020 University of California, Los Angeles christine.borgman@ucla.edu
Robert S. Chen 3/2014-2/2018 Columbia University & CIESIN bchen@ciesin.columbia.edu
Colin Elman 6/2014-2/2018 Syracuse University celman@maxwell.syr.edu
Jeremy Freese 3/2016-2/2020 Northwestern University jfreese@northwestern.edu
Jane Fry 3/2016-2/2020 Carleton University jane.fry@carleton.ca
Philip N. Jefferson 3/2014-2/2018 Swarthmore College pjeffer1@swarthmore.edu
Michael Jones-Correa 3/2016-2/2020 Cornell University mj64@cornell.edu
Verna M. Keith 3/2016-2/2020 Texas A&M University keithvm@tamu.edu
Chandra L. Muller, Chair 3/2014-2/2018 University of Texas at Austin cmuller@austin.utexas.edu
Ronald Nakao 3/2014-2/2018 Stanford University Libraries ronbo@stanford.edu
Robert Stine 3/2016-2/2020 University of Pennsylvania stine@wharton.upenn.edu
William Vega 3/2014-2/2018 University of Southern California williaav@usc.edu

Biographies

Photo of Christopher Achen Christopher H. Achen is the Roger Williams Straus Professor of Social Sciences, Professor of Politics at Princeton University. Achen’s research interest is political methodology, particularly in its application to empirical democratic theory, American politics, and international relations. He received his PhD from Yale University and has held professorships at University of California, Berkeley, University of Chicago, and University of Michigan. He is the author of two books, Interpreting and Using Regression and The Statistical Analysis of Quasi-Experiments; co-author of a third, Cross-Level Inference; and co-editor of a fourth book, The European Union Decides. His next book is entitled Voter Turnout in Multi-Level Systems. He was the first president of the Political Methodology Section of the American Political Science Association, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has received fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the National Science Foundation, and Princeton’s Center for the Study of Democratic Politics. He received the first career achievement award from The Political Methodology Section of The American Political Science Association in 2007. He is also the recipient of an award from the University of Michigan for lifetime achievement in training graduate students.

Photo of Christine Borgman Christine L. Borgman is Professor and Presidential Chair in Information Studies at UCLA. Prof. Borgman is the author of more than 200 publications in information studies, computer science, and communication, including three sole­authored monographs. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Association for Computing Machinery; a recipient of the Paul Evan Peters Award from the Coalition for Networked Information, Association for Research Libraries, and EDUCAUSE; the Research in Information Science Award from ASIST; and a Legacy Laureate of the University of Pittsburgh. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, U.S. Co­Chair of the CODATA­ICSTI Task Group on Data Citation and Attribution, and previously served on the U.S. National Academies? Board on Research Data and Information and the U.S. National CODATA. Among the editorial boards on which she serves are the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology and PLOS One.

Photo of Robert Chen Robert S. Chen is the director of the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) and a senior research scientist. He served as CIESIN's deputy director from July 1998-April 2006 and as CIESIN's interim director from May 2006-January 2007. Chen is also the manager and co-principal investigator of the Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center, a data center in the NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System. Chen has contributed to activities of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change for over a decade and has served as an ex officio member of the IPCC Task Group on Data and Scenario Support for Impacts and Climate Analysis and co-manager of the IPCC Data Distribution Center. He has been a co-chair of the indicators work group of the US National Climate Assessment and a member of the Science Advisory Board of the Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He also served as one of the co-principal investigators of the Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast, a multiuniversity initiative led by the Earth Institute with support from the Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessment program of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Chen has provided leadership on national and international scientific data management issues. At Columbia University, he has served on the faculty steering committee for the Columbia Global Centers East Asia. He also has served as an ex officio member of the Earth Institute faculty.

Photo of Colin Elman Colin Elman is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for Qualitative and Multi-Method Inquiry in the Maxwell School, Syracuse University. He is a co-founder of both the International History and Politics and the Qualitative and Multi-method Research organized sections of the American Political Science Association, and co-director of the annual summer Institute for Qualitative and Multi-Method Research. He co-directs (with Diana Kapiszewski, Georgetown University) the Qualitative Data Repository. He is series co-editor (with John Gerring, Boston University and James Mahoney, Northwestern University) of the Cambridge University Press Strategies for Social Inquiry book series, and (with Diana Kapiszewski and James Mahoney) the new Methods for Social Inquiry book series. Elman co-chairs (with Arthur Lupia, University of Michigan) the American Political Science Association's committee on Data Access and Research Transparency (DA-RT). Elman is (with Miriam Fendius Elman) the co-editor of Progress in International Relations Theory: Appraising the Field (MIT Press); and Bridges and Boundaries: Historians, Political Scientists, and the Study of International Relations (MIT Press); (with John Vasquez) of Realism and the Balancing of Power: A New Debate (Prentice Hall); and (with Michael Jensen) of the Realism Reader (Routledge). Elman has published articles in the American Political Science Review, Annual Review of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, International History Review, International Organization, International Security, International Studies Quarterly, Millennium, Political Science & Politics, and Security Studies.

Photo of Jeremy Freese Jeremy Freese is an Ethel and John Lindgren Professor of Sociology at Northwestern University. Dr. Freese is interested in drawing connections across biological, psychological, and social causes of divergence in individual's lives, especially as these intersect with technological and other kinds of social change. He has developed this interest across a variety of projects, including projects on Internet use, health policy, and innovations in genetics. Additionally, he has done work on social science methods, including co­authoring a book on the analyses of categorical data. Prior to joining the faculty at Northwestern, Freese was a professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin­Madison and a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at Harvard University.

Photo of Jane Fry Jane Fry is the Data Services Librarian at Carleton University (Ottawa, ON). Working with faculty and researchers to help them in all aspects of Research Data Management is her prime focus. Fry continues to be active in the data community, involving being a co­­developer for a number of initiatives including ODESI (the Ontario data portal), the Data Liberation Initiative (DLI) Training Repository, as well as the DLI Survival Guide. She is a member of various national and international data ­related professional groups, as well as the American Library Association. She has authored and co­authored a number of Best Practices Documents related to different operations in a Data Centre. Fry is also the OR for ICPSR at Carleton, as well as an instructor in the ICPSR Summer Program.

Photo of Philip Jefferson Philip N. Jefferson is the Centennial Professor of Economics at Swarthmore College and a former research economist at the Federal Reserve Board. His teaching and research interest are in macroeconomics, econometrics, poverty, and economic inequality. His recent research has delved into such issues as the role of education as a buffer against unemployment, the effect of business cycles on poverty rates, and the distribution of income between labor and capital. Jefferson, whose research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and who served as president of the National Economic Association in 2005, also is a Faculty Affiliate of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has held visiting appointments at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and the University of California. Before going to Swarthmore in 1997, he taught at Columbia University and the University of Virginia. He holds a BA in economics from Vassar College and an MA and PhD in economics from the University of Virginia. He is a recipient of the Eugene M. Lang Faculty Fellowship at Swarthmore, The Flack Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching and Promise in Scholarly Activity at Swarthmore, and several other awards. He has published several papers and is the editor of and a contributor to The Oxford Handbook of the Economics of Poverty.

Photo of Michael Jones-Correa Michael Jones-Correa is Professor of Government at Cornell University. He is the author as well of several dozen articles and chapters on immigration, race, ethnicity and citizenship in the United States. Professor Jones­Correa is currently working on several major projects, among them one looking at increasing ethnic diversity of suburbs, and its implication for local and national politics; another continuing the analysis of the 2006 Latino National Survey, a national state­stratified survey of Latinos in the United States for which he was a principal investigator; and collaborative research on contact, trust and civic participation across immigrant and native-born residents of Atlanta and Philadelphia. His research has received support from the Carnegie, Ford, MacArthur, Russell Sage and National Science Foundations, among others.

Photo of Verna M. Keith Verna M. Keith is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Race and Ethnic Studies Institute. Her research interests include race, class, and gender disparities in health and the effects of ethnic appearance on the social, economic, and psychological well­being of African Americans and other people of color. She is editor of In and Out of Right Minds: The Mental Health of African American Women Diane Brown and Skin Deep: How Race and Complexion Matter in the Color Blind Era with Cedric Herring and Hayward Horton.

Photo of Chandra Muller Chandra Muller holds the Alma Cowden Madden Centennial Professorship in Liberal Arts and is a professor of sociology at the University of Texas at Austin. She also is a faculty associate of the Population Research Center at the university. She received her PhD and MA degrees in sociology from the University of Chicago in 1991 and 1983, respectively. Muller received a master's in education from Stanford University in 1976 and a BA in sociology from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1975. Her current research is on how family, community, education policy, and health behaviors shape education and the transition to adulthood. In particular, she focuses on STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) preparation and careers. Of key interest is the diversity in experiences and disparities according to gender, race and ethnicity, social class, as well as disability, immigration or language minority status. She is co-author of the book Coming of Political Age: American Schools and the Civic Development of Immigrant Youth, and has published a large number of book chapters and articles. She has served as chair of the American Educational Research Association's Distinguished Contributions to Research in Education Award Committee, chair of the Sociology of Education Section of the American Sociological Association, and on the editorial boards of the journals Social Forces and Social Problems.

Photo of Ronald Nakao Ronald Nakao is a Data and Computational Social Science Librarian and has been a Data and Technology Specialist in the Social Sciences Data and Software division of the Stanford Libraries for over 20 years. He works extensively with faculty on their projects and assists them in addressing documentation, access, analysis, and archiving issues. He works with Stanford researchers to archive and redistribute social science research data via the Social Science Data and Software Data Collection. The SSDS provides resources and consulting for research and instruction in the social sciences. He developed the DEWI system to facilitate the creation of data subsets and was also instrumental in establishing data policies and procedures for the Stanford institutional repository. Nakao received his PhD in education from Stanford. He is the ICPSR Official Representative at Stanford and serves as the liaison to the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research. He is an instructor in the ICPSR Summer Program. He served from 2006-2010 as the vice-chair of the Expert Committee of the Data Documentation Initiative Alliance and as chair of the DDI Governance Task Force. He has been active in the community developing the Drupal open-source content management system. Nakao also is involved in the International Association for Social Science Information, Service, and Technology, and he hosted the annual IASSIST conference at Stanford in 2008.

Photo of Robert Stine Robert Stine is currently Research Associate, Analysis Center for Evaluation of Energy Modeling and Statistics. His research interests credit scoring, model selection, pattern recognition and classification, statistical computing and graphics, time series analysis and forecasting.

Photo of William Vega William Vega is Provost Professor and Executive Director of the Edward R. Roybal Institute on Aging at the University of Southern California. He holds appointments in social work, preventive medicine, psychiatry, and family medicine. He also is emeritus professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and he codirects the Network for Multicultural Research on Health and Healthcare at UCLA. An elected member of the Institute of Medicine, Vega has conducted research projects on health, mental health, and substance abuse throughout the United States and Latin America. His specialty is multicultural epidemiologic and services research with adolescents and adults. He has published more than 170 articles and chapters, and several books. The 2006 ISI Web of Science listed him in the top half of 1 percent of the most highly cited researchers worldwide in social science literature over the past two decades. Vega has been director of the Luskin Center for Innovation at UCLA. In 2002, he received the Society for Prevention Research's Community, Culture and Prevention Science Award and the National Hispanic Science Network on Drug Abuse's National Award of Excellence in Research by a Senior Scientist. Vega has served on many boards and task forces, including health disparities work groups of the National Institutes of Health, the US Attorney General's Task Force on Methamphetamine, the Institute of Medicine Board on Population Health, the Committee on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Treatment Effectiveness, and the Institute of Medicine Health Disparities Roundtable.

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