Infographics

Imports and Exports of Arts and Cultural Goods and Services, 2014 (in millions)

Exports:

  • Movies & TV Shows: $16,402
  • Advertising: $8,020
  • Jewelry & Silverware: $8,241
  • Book, Newspaper, and Magazine Publishing: $3,575

Imports:

  • Movies & TV Shows: $4,668
  • Advertising: $2,983
  • Jewelry & Silverware: $11,477
  • Book, Newspaper, and Magazine Publishing: $1,677

In 2014, these arts and culture related commodities generated about $21 billion in imports and over $35 billion in exports for the U.S. economy. Statistics for this infographic were drawn from the 2014 National Data Table 3: Supply and Consumprion of Commodities.

The Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account (ACPSA) is produced through the partnership between U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). Built with the BEA's input-output (I-O) accounts, the ACPSA provides detailed statistics that illustrate the impact of arts and cultural production on the U.S. economy. Specifically, this account provides an assessment of the arts and cultural sector's contributions to gross domestic product (GDP).

These infographics are related to the following data collection:
Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account (ICPSR 36357)

Consumer Expenditures on Entertainment in 2015

Plays, theater, opera, concerts

The United States consumers spent an average of $45.60 on admissions to plays, theater, opera, and concerts in 2015. The spending ranged from a low of $10.47 in the lowest spending percentile (the lowest 20 percent) to a high of $126.81 in the highest spending percentile (the highest 20 percent).

Movies, parks, museums

The United States consumers spent an average of $59.50 on admissions to movies, parks, and museums in 2015. The spending ranged from a low of $17.47 in the lowest spending percentile (the lowest 20 percent) to a high of $131.77 in the highest spending percentile (the highest 20 percent).

The Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) program provides information on the buying habits of American consumers, including data on their expenditures, income, and consumer unit (families and single consumers) characteristics. The survey data are collected for the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) by the United States Census Bureau. The CE collects all on all spending components including food, housing, apparel and services, transportation, entertainment, and out-of-pocket health care costs.

Statistics for this infographic were drawn from the unpublished integrated CE tables produced by the BLS. The tables used for this infographic provide data for the year 2015. The tables show average and percentile expenditures for detailed items, as well as the standard error and coefficient of variation (CV) for each spending estimate.

This infographic is related to the following dataset:
Consumer Expenditure Survey Summary Tables (ICPSR 36170)

Time Spent Per Day Watching TV by Quarter in 2015

Time spent watching TV on an average day each quarter varied seasonally. During quarters I and IV, which occur in the winter and fall, respondents spent more than 174 minutes watching TV on average. During quarters II and III, which occur in the spring and summer, respondents watched less than 158 minutes of TV on average. This suggests that on average respondents watched TV over 15 minutes more a day in colder seasons than warmer ones.

Watching TV includes watching television and movies.

NOTE: Data used for these statistics refer to the civilian population ages 15 years and over. These averages refer to time spent watching TV as a primary activity only. A primary activity refers to an individual's main activity. Other activities done simultaneously are not included. All major activities categories include related travel times. See Technical Note for activity category definitions. These estimates are not seasonally adjusted.

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) measures the amount of time people spend doing various activities, such as work and work-related activities, personal care, household activities, consumer purchases, volunteering, and caring for and helping household members. Respondents were also asked about arts-related activities including sports, recreation, socializing, relaxing, arts and crafts, and music appreciation. Additionally, the study provides demographic information--including sex, race, age, educational attainment, occupation, income, marital status, and the presence of children in the household.

For ATUS 2003-2015, 170,842 respondents were randomly selected from a subset of households that have completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). Respondents were interviewed only one time about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were, and whom they were with.

Statistics for this infographic were taken from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Economic News Release: American Time Use Survey Summary in Table 12 (last modified on June 24, 2016).

This infographic is related to the following dataset:
American Time Use Survey, 2003-2015 [United States]: Arts Activities (ICPSR 36268)

Consumer Expenditures on Entertainment in 2014

Plays, theater, opera, concerts
The United States consumers spent an average of $48.58 on admissions to plays, theater, opera, and concerts in 2014. The spending ranged from a low of $11.51 in the lowest spending percentile (the lowest 20 percent) to a high of $119.03 in the highest spending percentile (the highest 20 percent).

Movies, parks, museums
The United States consumers spent an average of $58.71 on admissions to movies, parks, and museums in 2014. The spending ranged from a low of $18.77 in the lowest spending percentile (the lowest 20 percent) to a high of $134.64 in the highest spending percentile (the highest 20 percent).

The Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) program provides information on the buying habits of American consumers, including data on their expenditures, income, and consumer unit (families and single consumers) characteristics. The survey data are collected for the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) by the United States Census Bureau. The CE collects all on all spending components including food, housing, apparel and services, transportation, entertainment, and out-of-pocket health care costs.

Statistics for this infographic were drawn from the unpublished integrated CE tables produced by the BLS. The tables used for this infographic provide data for the year 2014. The tables show average and percentile expenditures for detailed items, as well as the standard error and coefficient of variation (CV) for each spending estimate.

This infographic is related to the following dataset:
Consumer Expenditure Survey Summary Tables (ICPSR 36170)

Arts Attendance and Educational Attainment

Percent of adults who attended a visual or performing arts event in 2015:

  • All U.S. adults: 44.3 percent
  • U.S. adults holding bachelor's degrees or higher: 67.2 percent

In 2015, 44.3 percent of all U.S. adults attended a visual or performing arts event. However, among adults holding bachelor's degrees or higher levels of education, 67.2 percent attended.

The 2015 Annual Arts Basic Survey (AABS) studied American adults' participation in various artistic activities from February 2014 through February 2015. A total of 151,788 U.S. adults responded to the 2015 AABS. If the selected person had a spouse or partner, then the respondent answered questions on behalf of their spouse/partner.

These statistics were taken from Research Brief #5: Job Analysis of Arts Participants available through NEA's Arts Data Profile #10.

This infographic is related to the following dataset:
Annual Arts Basic Survey (AABS), 2015 (ICPSR 36424)

Gradual upward trend in visits to buildings, neighborhoods, parks, or monuments, 2012-2015

U.S. adults who visited sites for their historic or design value:

  • 2012: 24 percent
  • 2013: 26 percent
  • 2015: 27 percent

In 2015, 27 percent of U.S. adults visited sites for their historic or design value. That rate represented a small increase from the 2013 rate (26 percent), and it was up from the 24 percent in 2012.

The Annual Arts Basic Survey (AABS) for years 2013 and 2015 studied American adults' participation in various artistic activities from February 2012 through February 2013 and February 2014 through February 2015. A total of 150,827 U.S. adults responded to the 2013 AABS, while 151,788 U.S. adults responded to the 2015 AABS. If the selected person had a spouse or partner, then the respondent answered questions on behalf of their spouse/partner.

The Survey of Public Participation in the Arts in 2012 examined American adults' participation in the arts and other leisure activities. Most SPPA questions asked about arts participation in the last 12-months (July 1, 2011- July 1, 2012). A total of 35,735 U.S. adults responded. If the selected person had a spouse or partner, then the respondent answered questions on behalf of their spouse/partner.

These statistics were taken from Research Brief #1: Visual and Performing Arts Attendance; MovieGoing; Literary Reading; and Learning through Arts Classes or Lessons available through NEA's Arts Data Profile #10.

This infographic is related to the following datasets:
Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA), 2012 (ICPSR 35168)
Annual Arts Basic Survey (AABS), 2013 (ICPSR 36412)
Annual Arts Basic Survey (AABS), 2015 (ICPSR 36424)

High School Student Experience with the Arts, Fall 2009-Spring 2012

Students:
Percentage of high school students who participated in arts-related activities outside school during 9th, 10th, or 11th grade since fall 2009:

  • Music or dance: 35%
  • Art: 20%
  • Drama: 13%

Parents:
Percentage of parents during the academic year 2011-2012 who took their 11th-grade children to:

  • A play, concert or live show: 56%
  • An art museum or exhibit: 28%

The High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 followed students from 9th grade through the end of 12th grade to examine how choices of academic and extracurricular activities relate to decisions for post-secondary education and employment. A total of 23,503 students responded from over 900 high schools. The study surveyed students about their academic behavior (e.g., attendance, study habits); attitudes and beliefs (e.g., self-efficacy); social and cultural experiences; and emphasizes exposure to STEM activities. The study also surveyed the students' parents, school administrators, counselors, and science and math teachers to determine how these individuals influenced students' postsecondary plans. This study also includes transcript information.

This data collection also provides data on arts-related topics, including student participation in outside of schools arts activities; credit hours of art classes taken; GPA from art classes; and parent lead arts experiences.

This analysis was conducted using data from the High School Longitudinal Study, 2009-2013 [United States]. Data are weighted.

These infographics are related to the following data collection:
High School Longitudinal Study, 2009-2013 [United States] (ICPSR 36423)

Motion Picture & Video Production: Employment and Payroll in California, 2012

In 2012, 71,229 people were employed in Motion picture and video production in California with $7.5 billion in annual payroll.

In California during the same year, 303,838 people were employed in the entire Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation industry with $13.4 billion in annual payroll.

The Economic Census is the United States Government's official five-year measure of American business and the economy. It is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, and response is required by law. In October through December 2012, forms were sent out to nearly 4 million businesses, including large, medium and small companies representing all U.S. locations and industries. Respondents were asked to provide a range of operational and performance data for their companies.

The 2012 statistics for the Motion picture and video production industry in California were drawn from the Fun Facts about the Geographic Area Series available on the Economic Census website. The 2012 statistics for the Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation industry in California were drawn from the American FactFinder also available on the Economic Census website.

This infographic is related to the following data collection:
Economic Census (ICPSR 36382)

Consumer Expenditures on Entertainment in 2013-2014

Plays, theater, opera, concerts
The United States consumers spent an average of $40.80 on admissions to plays, theater, opera, and concerts in 2013-2014. The spending ranged from a low of $12.16 in the lowest spending percentile (the lowest 20 percent) to a high of $115.47 in the highest spending percentile (the highest 20 percent).

Movies, parks, museums
The United States consumers spent an average of $53.34 on admissions to movies, parks, and museums in 2013-2014. The spending ranged from a low of $16.86 in the lowest spending percentile (the lowest 20 percent) to a high of $123.35 in the highest spending percentile (the highest 20 percent).

The Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) program provides information on the buying habits of American consumers, including data on their expenditures, income, and consumer unit (families and single consumers) characteristics. The survey data are collected for the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) by the United States Census Bureau. The CE collects all on all spending components including food, housing, apparel and services, transportation, entertainment, and out-of-pocket health care costs.

Statistics for this infographic were drawn from the unpublished integrated CE tables produced by the BLS. These tables used for this infographic cover the period spanning the third quarter of 2013 through the fourth quarter of 2014. The tables show average and percentile expenditures for detailed items, as well as the standard error and coefficient of variation (CV) for each spending estimate.

This infographic is related to the following datasets:
Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2013: Diary Survey Files (ICPSR 36275)
Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2013: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files (ICPSR 36237)

Imports and Exports of Arts and Cultural Goods and Services, 2013 (in millions)

Exports:

  • Movies & TV Shows: $15,930
  • Advertising: $7,138
  • Jewelry & Silverware: $8,058
  • Book, Newspaper, and Magazine Publishing: $3,659

Imports:

  • Movies & TV Shows: $4,127
  • Advertising: $2,803
  • Jewelry & Silverware: $12,214
  • Book, Newspaper, and Magazine Publishing: $1,558

In 2013, these arts and culture related commodities generated over $21 billion in imports and close to $35 billion in exports for the U.S. economy. For a more details on imports and exports of arts and cultural goods and services in the U.S., please refer to Arts and Cultural Issue Brief #7 on the National Endowment for the Arts website.

The Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account (ACPSA) is produced through the partnership between U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). Built with the BEA's input-output (I-O) accounts, the ACPSA provides detailed statistics that illustrate the impact of arts and cultural production on the U.S. economy. Specifically, this account provides an assessment of the arts and cultural sector's contributions to gross domestic product (GDP).

These Infographics were taken from Arts and Cultural Issue Brief #7 available through NEA's Arts Data Profile #9.

These infographics are related to the following data collection:
Arts and Cultural Production Satellite Account (ICPSR 36357)

Education Matters:
Time Spent Per Weekday Watching TV and Reading in 2014

On an average day, individuals without a high school diploma watch 110 minutes more TV than those with college degrees. They also spend less daily time reading—typically 15 minutes less than time spent reading by college graduates.

Watching TV included watching television and movies (not religious and religious).

Reading included reading any materials for personal interest.

NOTE: Data used for this infographic referred to persons 25 years and over.

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) measures the amount of time people spend doing various activities, such as work and work-related activities, personal care, household activities, consumer purchases, volunteering, and caring for and helping household members. Respondents were also asked about arts-related activities including sports, recreation, socializing, relaxing, arts and crafts, and music appreciation. Additionally, the study provides demographic information--including sex, race, age, educational attainment, occupation, income, marital status, and the presence of children in the household.

For ATUS 2003-2014, 159,937 respondents were randomly selected from a subset of households that have completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). Respondents were interviewed only one time about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were, and whom they were with.

Data for this infographic were taken from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Economic News Release: American Time Use Survey Summary in Table 11 (last modified on June 24, 2015).

This infographic is related to the following dataset:
American Time Use Survey, 2003-2014: Arts Activities (ICPSR 36268)

Museum Attendance

On an average day, museums draw more than 500,000 people. And on an average weekend day or holiday, this figure climbs to 885,000 people.

NOTE: Data used for this infographic referred to American Time Use Survey's averages for years 2005-2009.

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) measures the amount of time people spend doing various activities, such as work and work-related activities, personal care, household activities, consumer purchases, volunteering, and caring for and helping household members. Respondents were also asked about arts-related activities including sports, recreation, socializing, relaxing, arts and crafts, and music appreciation. Additionally, the study provides demographic information--including sex, race, age, educational attainment, occupation, income, marital status, and the presence of children in the household. More specifically, ATUS data contain details about residents living in households in the United States that are at least 15 years of age, with the exception of active military personnel and people residing in institutions such as nursing homes and prisons.

Statistics for this infographic were drawn from Time and Money: Using Federal Data to Measure the Value of Performing Art Activities. (NEA Research Note #102; April 2011).

In addition, ATUS averages for 2005-2009 in NEA Research Note #102 show that most visitors spent 2.4 hours (2 hours and 24 minutes) at museums. Museum attendance was decidedly a late-morning and early-afternoon activity. At 10:00 am, for example, 34 percent of participants were visiting museums. Museum attendance peaked between noon and 1:00 pm.

This infographic is related to the following dataset:
American Time Use Survey, 2003-2014: Arts Activities (ICPSR 36268)

Arts & Culture in American Life

Percent of U.S. adults who:

  • Read books: 58%
  • Access music via mobile devices: 34%
  • Dance socially: 32%
  • Do artistic photography/photo editing: 18%
  • Attend plays or musicals: 18%

The Survey of Public Participation in the Arts in 2012 examined American adults' participation in the arts and other leisure activities. Most SPPA questions asked about arts participation in the last 12-months (July 1, 2011- July 1, 2012). A total of 35,735 U.S. adults responded. If the selected person had a spouse or partner, then the respondent answered questions on behalf of their spouse/partner.

Read books includes reading any books with the exception of books required for work or school.

Access music via mobile devices includes downloading, watching, or listening to any music using a smart phone, MP3 player, e-book reader, or a laptop, notebook, or tablet computer.

Dance socially includes dancing at weddings, clubs, or other social settings

Do artistic photography/photo editing includes taking any photographs as an artistic activity or doing any photo editing

Attend plays or musicals includes going to a live performance of a musical or nonmusical stage play

These Infographics were taken from How a Nation Engages with Art: Highlights from the 2012 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (NEA Research Report #57; September 2013, October 2014 Revision). For these results, adults are counted multiple times if they participated in more than one category.

These Infographics are related to the following dataset:
Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA), 2012 (ICPSR 35168)

Viewing or Listening to the Arts

Percent of U.S. adults who participated in:

  • Moviegoing: 59%
  • Voluntary Reading: 58%
  • Visual or Performing Arts Attendance: 49%
  • Arts Consumption through Electronic Media: 71%

The Survey of Public Participation in the Arts in 2012 examined American adults' participation in the arts and other leisure activities. Most SPPA questions asked about arts participation in the last 12-months (July 1, 2011- July 1, 2012). A total of 35,735 U.S. adults responded. If the selected person had a spouse or partner, then the respondent answered questions on behalf of their spouse/partner.

Moviegoing includes going out to the movies or going to see a film.

Reading includes reading any books with the exception of books required for work or school.

Visual/Performing Arts Attendance includes going to a live performance with the exception of elementary or high school performances. Live performances included jazz; Latin, Spanish, or salsa music; classical music; opera; musical stage play; nonmusical stage play; ballet; modern, contemporary, folk, traditional, or tap dance; any other music, theater, or dance performance.

Via Electronic Media
Adults are included in this category if they did at least one of the following:

  • Used a TV or radio to watch or listen to, or used the Internet to watch, listen to or download any Jazz; Latin, Spanish, or salsa music; classical music; opera; other music such as rock, pop, country, folk, rap, or hip-hop; theater productions; ballet, modern, or contemporary dance, other dance, programs or information about the visual arts, such as painting, sculpture, graphic design, photography; programs or information about books or writers; and book, short stories, or poetry read aloud..
  • Used a DVD or CD player or record or tape player to watch or listen to music or programs about theater, dance, visual arts, or literature
  • Used any handheld or mobile devices to:
    • Read, listen to, or download any novels, short stories, poetry or plays
    • Download, watch, or listen to any music
    • Watch, listen to, or download any theater or dance performances?
    • Download or view any visual arts such as painting, sculpture, graphic design, or photography

These Infographics were taken from How a Nation Engages with Art: Highlights from the 2012 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (NEA Research Report #57; September 2013, October 2014 Revision). For these results, adults are counted multiple times if they participated in more than one category. Respondents were given examples of handheld or mobile devices, including a smart phone, MP3 player, e-book reader, or a laptop, notebook, or tablet computer.

These Infographics are related to the following dataset:
Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA), 2012 (ICPSR 35168)


Sharing the Arts Experience

Percent of survey respondents who in the past year:

  • Attended an art exhibit: 34%
    • alone: 9%
    • With 1 person: 45%
    • With 2 or more: 46%
  • Attended a live performance: 46%
    • Alone: 3%
    • With 1 person: 43%
    • With 2 or more: 54%

Of the 46% who attended a live performance: the performance attended was dance 27%, theater 40%, and music 72%.

The General Social Survey (GSS) collects information from the general public on a wide variety of subjects, including attitudes toward social issues, religion, education, jobs and the economy, government and other institutions, politics, and policy issues. The GSS 2012 included a "Cultural Module," a battery of questions focused on culture and the arts.

Art exhibits included those for painting, sculpture, textiles, graphic design, and photography.

Live performances included music, theater, and dance, and did not include elementary or high school performances.

The 2012 GSS Cultural Module data also asked who the respondent attended with, if the performance attended was free, factors that impacted the decision to attend or not attend, and demographic information including age, sex, race, and income.

These Infographics were taken from General Social Survey, 2012 Merged Data, Including a Cultural Module [United States]. Data are weighted.

These Infographics are related to the following dataset:
General Social Survey, 2012 Merged Data, Including a Cultural Module (ICPSR 35478)

Free and easy access to data on the arts and on the arts' value and impact for individuals and communities