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Pub. Type:
Report
Title:
The Electronic Monitoring of Non-Violent Convicted Felons: An Experiment in Home Detention, Final Report
Subtitle/Series Name:
Abstract:
The program was designed as an alternative to prison or jail for offenders charged with suspendible nonviolent offenses. All offenders were assigned to the program as a condition of probation. Manually monitored clients received three to five personal contacts per week from a home detention officer, along with a minimum of one phone contact per day. Some offenders were monitored electronically through a microcomputer that generated telephone calls to the offenders. Offenders were required to respond by answering the questions generated by the system and placing the "wristlet" in a unit attached to the telephone line in the home. A total of 154 offenders participated in the research. The evaluation consisted of randomized placement under the two monitoring methods, intake and exit interviews with offenders, the collection of information about current and previous charges, documentation of program delivery, field observations of the program's operation, and a check of offenders' criminal histories one year after release. There were few differences in offender performance according to monitoring method, either during the program or after release. A substantial minority of offenders reported some minor discomfort with electronic monitoring. Felonious drunk drivers performed better in the program than other offenders. Postrelease arrests indicated an immediate adjustment problem that suggested the need for graduated release or aftercare. 29 references, appended tables and evaluation instruments. For the executive summary of the final report, see NCJ-123614. source
Issue/No.:
NCJ 125653
Producer:
United States Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice
Place of Production:
Washington, DC

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