Johns Hopkins University Prevention Research Center - Risks for Transitions in Drug Use Among Urban Adults, Baltimore City, 2008-2011 (ICPSR 36622)

Alternate Title:   JHU PRC

Principal Investigator(s): Eaton, William, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health

Summary:

The Johns Hopkins University Prevention Research center - Risks for Transitions, Baltimore city, 2008-2011 study (JHU PRC Risks for Transition in Drug Use among Urban Adults) represents data collected for a 25 years follow-up from the original JHU PRC study. At the start of the data collection, a cohort of 2,311 youth were randomly assigned to two classroom-based universal preventive interventions implemented in 43 classrooms of 19 public schools located in 5 socio-demographically distinct areas in Eastern Baltimore. This collection includes data from 1,434 respondents from the original cohort collected in 2008-2012. The mean age of the respondents was 30-32 years old.

Psychopathology (major depressive episode, phobia and anxiety disorders) was assessed using modules from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-University of Michigan Version, CIDI- UM (WHO, 1997). An antisocial symptom scale adapted from the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) was administered which consisted of 30 questions that assessed behaviors experienced since turning 18 years of age. The alcohol, tobacco and drug modules of the interview were modeled after NESARC Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-IV. Types of information in these modules collected include age of onset, use in past year and prior past year, frequency and recency of use, and DSM-IV abuse and dependence criteria. Socioeconomic status indicators, variables on education, employment, marital status, parenthood, social supports, family history of mental health and drug problems, general health, treatment utilization, and life events are included in this dataset.

This dataset includes 3,140 variables.

Access Notes

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions ; consult the restrictions note to learn more. You can apply online for access to the restricted-use data. A login is required to apply.

    Access to this study is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

    Users are reminded that these data are to be used solely for statistical analysis and reporting of aggregated information, and not for the investigation of specific individuals or organizations.

    Any public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

Dataset(s)

Dataset
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Study Description

Citation

Eaton, William. Johns Hopkins University Prevention Research Center - Risks for Transitions in Drug Use Among Urban Adults, Baltimore City, 2008-2011. ICPSR36622-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2017-10-13. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36622.v1

Persistent URL: https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36622.v1

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse (5 R01 DA 009897)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:    alcohol, anxiety, arrest records, death, depression (psychology), detention, drug dependence, drug use, education, employment, family history, health, hospitalization, marital status, mental disorders, mental health, sexual assault, social problems, substance abuse, suicide, supplemental security income, tobacco use, treatment facilities

Smallest Geographic Unit:    None

Geographic Coverage:    Baltimore, Maryland, United States

Unit of Observation:    Individual

Universe:    Adults located in 5 socio-demographically distinct areas in Eastern Baltimore, Maryland

Data Type(s):    observational data, survey data

Data Collection Notes:

ICPSR extracted some information for the study level metadata from the following file found online: Prevention Research Center Cohort 1 and 2 Data Users Guide.

The title year states that the data are from 2008 to 2011; however, the data includes interview dates from 2008-10-9 to 2012-10-10; there are 15 cases in 2012.

Methodology

Sample:    The JHU PRC study used random cluster sampling. At the start of the data collection, a cohort of 2,311 youth were randomly assigned to two classroom-based universal preventive interventions implemented in 43 classrooms of 19 public schools located in 5 socio-demographically distinct areas in Eastern Baltimore. In 2008-2011, 1,434 of the original cohort were interviewed. This collection was the latest follow-up as the participants were 30-32 years of age. The sample denominator included all 2,311 participants, although priority was given to locating and interviewing those whom had been interviewed in the young adulthood phase and those who had participated in several of the childhood interviews.

Time Method:    Longitudinal: Panel

Weight:    None

Mode of Data Collection:    coded on-site observation, face-to-face interview, mixed mode, on-site questionnaire

Description of Variables:   

This dataset included the following sections:

  • Section A: Life Chart includes information on the past several years of the respondent's life over time about demographics, education, employment, and marital status.
  • Section B: Wellness and Health includes respondent's general health, treatment, and family health history.
  • Section C: Tobacco Use, Section D: Alcohol, and Section E: Drug use includes information on age of onset, use in past year and prior past year, frequency and recency of use, and DSM-IV abuse and dependence criteria.
  • Section F: Panic includes information on the feelings regarding ordinary situations encountered in the everyday lives, and how they react to or cope with these situations. Also includes whether the respondent noticed having problems during the worst spells of suddenly feeling frightened or anxious of uneasy.
  • Section G: Anxiety includes information on the periods of feeling worried and anxious, the problems that the respondent may have when they were worried and anxious, such as easily tired, and easily startled and so on.
  • Section H: Phobia includes information on situations where the respondent reported being always frightened badly, such as being in a crowd or standing in line, also includes the unreasonable fear of doing things in front of others, and of doing any of these things ever kept the respondent from going to social event.
  • Section I: Depression includes information on the age of onset, the time period of feeling sad or depressed, and the problems caused by these feelings.
  • Section J: Traumatic Events and PTSD includes information on the stressful experiences that the respondent had, such as military combat, age of onset, frequency, and recency of traumatic events.
  • Section L: Behaviors included information on the behaviors since turning 18, such as quit a job without knowing where you would find another one.
  • Section M: Household Information includes information on the respondent's living situation, such as did the respondent own or rent the house/apartment/place, and how many children do they have.
  • Section N: Income/Insurance includes information on the household income, financial situations, and health insurance.
  • Section O: Service and Treatment includes information on the respondent's health and health practices.
  • Section P: Family and Social Influences includes information on age family member died, family history of mental health and drug problems, and treatment utilization.
  • Section Q: Social Networks includes information on how and how often the respondent kept in touch with family and relatives, friends, and how much the family and friends care about him/her.

Presence of Common Scales:    Psychopathology(major depressive episode, phobia and anxiety disorders) was assessed using modules from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-University of Michigan Version, CIDI-UM(WHO,1997). An antisocial symptom scale adapted from the NESARC consisted of 30 questions that assessed behaviors experience since turning 18 years of age(Grant et al.2003).

Extent of Processing:   ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Created variable labels and/or value labels.
  • Standardized missing values.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:   2017-10-13

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