National Addiction & HIV Data Archive Program

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Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS): National Criminal Justice Treatment Program (NCJTP) Survey in the United States, 2002-2008 (ICPSR 27382) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

The National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices (NCJTP) Survey provides a comprehensive inquiry into the nature of programs and services provided to adult and juvenile offenders involved in the justice system in the United States. Participants included key criminal justice administrators, operations managers, and staff. This survey was conducted in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The survey involved a myriad of state, regional, and local organizations employing a mix of their own staff and contracted personnel, and services that might involve multiple levels of government. It was a self-administrated, paper-and-pencil questionnaire. The methodology included a multilevel approach that captured the perspective of executives, front-line administrators, and line staff about current practices in a range of institutional and community correctional settings for adults and juveniles. The goals for this survey were: to describe current drug treatment practices, policies, and delivery systems for offenders on probation or parole supervision, and in jails, prisons, and youth institutions; to examine agency structures, resources, and other organizational factors that may affect service delivery, including mission, leadership, climate, culture, and beliefs about rehabilitation versus punishment; and to assess coordination and integration across criminal justice agencies and between corrections and treatment systems. Items in the survey included: respondent characteristics, organizational characteristics, correctional programs characteristics (e.g., size, nature, etc.), substance abuse treatment programs characteristics, social networks/agencies collaboration, integration of services with other agencies, attitudes toward punishment and rehabilitation (personal values), organizational needs assessment, organizational culture and climate for treatment, cynicism toward change, organizational commitment to treatment, and perspectives on intradepartmental coordination.

Series: Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS) Series

Access Notes

  • These data are freely available.

Dataset(s)

DS0:  Study-Level Files
Documentation:
DS1:  S1: Survey of Executives Data - Download All Files (6.1 MB)
DS2:  S3A: Survey of Administrators Data - Download All Files (18.3 MB)
DS3:  S3B: Survey of Treatment Program Directors Data - Download All Files (10.7 MB)
DS4:  S4A: Survey of Correctional, Probation, and Parole Staff Data - Download All Files (9.3 MB)
DS5:  S4B: Survey of Treatment Staff Data - Download All Files (7.6 MB)

Study Description

Citation

Taxman, Faye S. Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS): National Criminal Justice Treatment Program (NCJTP) Survey in the United States, 2002-2008. ICPSR27382-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2010-08-09. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR27382.v1

Persistent URL:

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   addiction, alcohol abuse, cocaine, controlled drugs, correctional facilities (adults), correctional facilities (juveniles), drug abuse, drug dependence, drug offenders, drug overdose, drug testing, drug use, hallucinogens, heroin, marijuana, steroid use, substance abuse treatment

Smallest Geographic Unit:   county

Geographic Coverage:   District of Columbia, United States

Time Period:  

  • 2002--2008

Date of Collection:  

  • 2002--2008
  • 2008--2010

Universe:   The universe for Part 1 (Survey of Executives Data) includes all executives of state agencies, executives in correctional agencies responsible for programs and services. The universe for Part 2 (Survey of Administrators Data) includes administrators responsible for the facility, office, or program identified in adult prisons, juvenile residential facilities, and community sample. For Part 3 (Survey of Treatment Program Directors Data), the universe includes prison wardens, directors of juvenile facilities, jail wardens and directors (who were sheriffs in some counties), and administrators responsible for local probation and parole offices. The universe for Part 4 (Survey of Correctional, Probation, and Parole Staff Data) Include staff working in prison and community-based agencies and programs that were located in states covered by the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS). And the universe for Part 5 (Survey of Treatment Staff Data) includes all the treatment staffs working in prisons and community-based agencies, and programs that were located in states covered by the CJ-DATS.

Data Types:   survey data

Data Collection Notes:

The survey involves a myriad of state, regional, and local organizations employing a mix of their own staff and contracted personnel, and the services may involve multiple levels of government.

Reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) overseeing research at each of the 11 research centers comprising National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) CJ-DATS network.

The sampling frame for S2: Survey of corrections clinical directors and alcohol and drug agency directors data was based on having one central person in each agency that was aware of the programs and services offered. It was determined that at the end the data provided could not be validated because most agencies did not have one central person who knew the agency programs and services. It was determined to use S3 data for the national estimates.

Methodology

Study Purpose:   The objectives of this study were to describe the current drug treatment practices, policies, and delivery systems of offenders on probation or parole supervision, and in jails, prisons, and youth institutions. In addition, it was meant to examine agency structures, resources, and other organizational factors that may affect service delivery, including mission, leadership, climate, culture, and beliefs about rehabilitation versus punishment. Finally, it assesses the coordination and integration across criminal justice agencies and between corrections and treatment systems.

Study Design:   The mode of the survey was a self-administered paper-and-pencil questionnaire. This study consisted of a survey delivered to employees within correctional and treatment systems nationally, including agency administrators, wardens, program managers, and counselors and correctional officers. The survey included questions about the organizational structure and resources, the work environment, support for treatment, the value and purpose of substance abuse treatment, and the type and amount of treatment services offered. It was estimated the survey would take about 30 to 60 minutes to complete. Administrators also requested the permission of agency directors that staff who participate should be allowed to complete the survey during regular work hours. Participants were able to access the findings at the CJ-DATS (www.cjdats.org) Web site and by the researchers.

Sample:   The sampling for the study consisted of: (1) census of state correctional agency executives and clinical coordinators, and state alcohol and drug abuse directors, (2) adult prison sample, (3) juvenile residential facilities sample, and (4) community sample.

Mode of Data Collection:   mail questionnaire, mixed mode

Response Rates:   The response rate for Part 1 (Survey of Executives Data) was 70.8 percent. The response rate for Part 2 (Survey of Administrators Data) and Part 3 (Survey of Treatment Program Directors Data) totaled 62.5 percent. The response rate for Part 4 (Survey of Correctional, Probation, and Parole Staff Data) and Part 5 (Survey of Treatment Staff Data) totaled 33.9 percent.

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Standardized missing values.
  • Created online analysis version with question text.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

Related Publications

Variables

Browse Matching Variables

DS1: S1: Survey of Executives Data

IMP-MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING
14b. Below are examples of programs that may be offered to offenders in correctional settings. Using the scale shown, rate the importance of providing each program compared to substance abuse treatment. c. Mental health counseling
BUDGET ISSUES-MENTAL HEALTH
23. In your position, on which issues do you have direct contact (in person or via phone) with people in the following positions within your organization? a3) Budget issues mental health or other offender program director
SPECIAL INITIATIVES-MENTAL HEALTH
23. In your position, on which issues do you have direct contact (in person or via phone) with people in the following positions within your organization? b3) Special or legislative initiatives mental health or other offender program director
MEMO OF UNDERSTANDING-MENTAL HEALTH
23. In your position, on which issues do you have direct contact (in person or via phone) with people in the following positions within your organization? c3) Memorandum of understanding related to treatment issues for offenders mental health or other offender program director
PRISON ISSUES-MENTAL HEALTH
23. In your position, on which issues do you have direct contact (in person or via phone) with people in the following positions within your organization? d3) General prison or facility issues (e.g. overcrowding, physical space, recent violence) mental health or other offender program director
PROBATION ISSUES-MENTAL HEALTH
23. In your position, on which issues do you have direct contact (in person or via phone) with people in the following positions within your organization? e3) General probation issues (e.g. case size, space, staffing, etc.) mental health or other offender program director
ASSESSMENT ISSUES-MENTAL HEALTH
23. In your position, on which issues do you have direct contact (in person or via phone) with people in the following positions within your organization? f3) Assessment/screening issues for treatment programs mental health or other offender program director
CLINICAL PROGRAMMING-MENTAL HEALTH
23. In your position, on which issues do you have direct contact (in person or via phone) with people in the following positions within your organization? g3) Clinical programming for treatment programs mental health or other offender program director
SERVICE GAPS-MENTAL HEALTH
23. In your position, on which issues do you have direct contact (in person or via phone) with people in the following positions within your organization? h3) Service gaps for treatment programming mental health or other offender program director
TRANSITIONAL PLANS-MENTAL HEALTH
23. In your position, on which issues do you have direct contact (in person or via phone) with people in the following positions within your organization? j3) Transitional or reentry planning for drug offenders mental health or other offender program director

DS2: S3A: Survey of Administrators Data

OCCUR-MEDICATION FOR MENTAL HEALTH
33. Please indicate whether these procedures occur at your facility/location(s). a. Medication-based treatment may be used for treating mental health problems
SERVICE-MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING
34. Approximately how many offenders are provided the following services through your facility/location by your staff or by referral to another agency? g. Mental health counseling
IMP-MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING
36b. Below are examples of programs that may be offered to offenders in correctional settings. Using the scale shown, rate the importance of providing each program compared to substance abuse treatment. c. Mental health counseling
TOOLS-OTHER MENTAL HEALTH
44. Please indicate what standardized assessment tools are used in your facility/location and about how many offenders are assessed with that tool. m. Other standardized mental health instrument (specify)
TARGET POP-MENTAL HEALTH OFFENDERS
25. b. What type of offender population(s) is served in this specialized facility/location? 3) Mental health offenders
SERVICE-ASSESS FOR MENTAL HEALTH PROBS
34. Approximately how many offenders are provided the following services through your facility/location by your staff or by referral to another agency? f. Assessments for mental health problems
Use of Mental Health Tool (SEE Documentation for Part 2)
Whether a facility uses Mental Health Tool
REDUCE-PROVIDE TREATMENT
19. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about crime reduction? f. Provide criminals with treatment to address addiction, mental health problems, or other problems

DS3: S3B: Survey of Treatment Program Directors Data

PROVIDED-MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING
39. Please check the services that are provided in your program on a regular basis. 3. Mental health counseling disorders
TOOLS-OTHER MENTAL HEALTH
33. Please indicate what standardized assessment tools are used in your facility/location and about how many offenders are assessed with that tool. m. Other standardized mental health instrument (specify)
IMP-MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING
51c. Below are examples of programs that may be offered to offenders in correctional settings. Using the scale shown, rate the importance of providing each program compared to substance abuse treatment. c. Mental health counseling
INVOLVE W/-MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMS
48. Please identify the level of involvement that your facility/location has with other organizations or offices on issues related to providing substance abuse services to offenders. g. Mental health programs
COUNS EXP/EDUC-HAVE CERTIFICATION
31. Please tell us about how many primary substance abuse counselors in your program have the following experiences and educational backgrounds. c. Have certification in a general mental health specialty (such as psychology)
NEED TRAINING-PROV COUNS FOR MENTAL HLTH
32. Using the following scale, indicate your substance abuse treatment staffs need for training in the following areas: e. Providing counseling for offenders mental health problems

DS4: S4A: Survey of Correctional, Probation, and Parole Staff Data

Importance of providing each program: Mental health counseling
Importance of providing each program: Mental health counseling
Service provided in your facility/location? Mental health counseling
Service provided in your facility/location? Mental health counseling
Treatment staff needs training in providing counseling for offenders mental health problems
28. Using the following scale, indicate your substance abuse treatment staff need for training in the following areas: Treatment staff needs training in providing counseling for offenders mental health problems
Provide criminals with treatment to address addiction, mental health problems, or other problems.
32. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about crime reduction? The best way to reduce crime is f. Provide criminals with treatment to address addiction, mental health problems, or other problems.
Which particular client/offender population? Co-occurring clients (mental health & substance abuse)
Which particular client/offender population? Co-occurring clients (mental health & substance abuse)

DS5: S4B: Survey of Treatment Staff Data

Importance of providing each program: Mental health counseling
Below are examples of programs that may be offered to offenders in correctional settings. Using the scale shown, rate the importance of providing each program compared to substance abuse treatment. Mental health counseling
Service provided in your facility/location? Mental health counseling
Please check the services that are provided in your program on a regular basis. Mental health counseling
Provide criminals with treatment to address addiction, mental health problems, or other problems.
To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements about crime reduction? Provide criminals with treatment to address addiction, mental health problems, or other problems.
How much training you need in providing counseling for offenders mental health problems
Using the following scale, indicate how much you think you need training in each of the following areas: I need training in Providing counseling for offenders mental health problems

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