National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) Series

The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) is a major source of statistical information on the use of illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco and on mental health issues among members of the U.S. civilian, non-institutional population aged 12 or older. The survey tracks trends in specific substance use and mental illness measures and assesses the consequences of these conditions by examining mental and/or substance use disorders and treatment for these disorders. Examples of uses of NSDUH data include the identification of groups at high risk for initiation of substance use and issues among those with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental illness.

NSDUH public-use data files are available for:

  • download in SAS, SPSS, STATA and ASCII formats; and

  • online analysis with SDA (?);

NSDUH restricted-use data files are available for:

The population of the NSDUH series is the general civilian population aged 12 and older in the United States. Questions include age at first use, as well as lifetime, annual, and past-month usage for the following drugs: alcohol, marijuana, cocaine (including crack), hallucinogens, heroin, inhalants, tobacco, pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, and sedatives. The survey covers substance abuse treatment history and perceived need for treatment, and includes questions from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of Mental Disorders that allow diagnostic criteria to be applied. Respondents were also asked about personal and family income sources and amounts, health care access and coverage, illegal activities and arrest record, problems resulting from the use of drugs, perceptions of risks, and needle-sharing. Demographic data include gender, race, age, ethnicity, educational level, job status, income level, veteran status, household composition, and population density.

The questionnaire was significantly redesigned in 1994. The 1994 survey for the first time included a rural population supplement to allow separate estimates to be calculated for this population. Other modules have been added each year and retained in subsequent years: mental health and access to care (1994-B); risk/availability of drugs (1996); cigar smoking and new questions on marijuana and cocaine use (1997); question series asked only of respondents aged 12 to 17 (1997); questions on tobacco brand (1999); marijuana purchase questions (2001); prior marijuana and cigarette use, additional questions on drug treatment, adult mental health services, and social environment (2003); and adult and adolescent depression questions derived from the National Comorbidity Survey, Replication (NCS-R) and National Comorbidity Survey, Adolescent (NCS-A) (2004).

Survey administration and sample design were improved with the implementation of the 1999 survey, and additional improvements were made in 2002. Since 1999, the survey sample has employed a 50-state design with an independent, multistage area probability sample for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. At this time, the collection mode of the survey changed from personal interviews and self-enumerated answer sheets to using computer-assisted personal interviews and audio computer-assisted self interviews. In 2002, the survey's title was officially changed to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). Participants have been given $30 for participating in the study since then. This resulted in an increase in participation rates from the years prior to 2002. Also, in 2002 and 2011, the new population data from the 2000 and 2010 decennial Censuses, respectively, became available for use in the sample weighting procedures. For these reasons, data gathered for 2002 and beyond cannot validly be compared to data prior to 2002.

The NSDUH is sponsored by the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (formerly Office of Applied Studies), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. For more information, visit the NSDUH Web site.

Reports & Related Sites

Variable Crosswalk

The variable crosswalk displays all variables in the series and their availability by study year.

Most Recent Studies

Related Publications

Most Recent Publications

2016
Brown, Qiana L.,  Hasin, Deborah S.,  Keyes, Katherine M.,  Fink, David S.,  Ravenell, Orson,  Martins, Silvia S. Health insurance, alcohol and tobacco use among pregnant and non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Drug and Alcohol Dependence.
Full Text Options: DOI Worldcat Google Scholar
Export Options: RIS/EndNote
2016
Chen, Lian-Yu,  Crum, Rosa M.,  Strain, Eric C.,  Alexander, G. Caleb,  Kaufmann, Christopher,  Mojtabai, Ramin . Prescriptions, nonmedical use, and emergency department visits involving prescription stimulants. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. e297-e304.
Full Text Options: DOI Worldcat Google Scholar
Export Options: RIS/EndNote
2016
Higgins, Stephen T.,  Kurti, Allison N.,  Redner, Ryan,  White, Thomas J.,  Keith, Diana R.,  Gaalema, Diann E.,  Sprague, Brian L.,  Stanton, Cassandra A.,  Roberts, Megan E.,  Doogan, Nathan J.,  Priest, Jeff S. Co-occurring risk factors for current cigarette smoking in a U.S. nationally representative sample. Preventive Medicine.
Full Text Options: DOI Worldcat Google Scholar
Export Options: RIS/EndNote
2016
Ko, Jungyai,  Harrington, Donna . Factor structure and validity of the K6 scale for adults with suicidal ideation. Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research. 7, (1), 43-63.
Full Text Options: DOI Worldcat Google Scholar
Export Options: RIS/EndNote
2016
Kuramoto-Crawford, S. Janet,  Han, Beth,  Jacobus-Kantor, Laura,  Mojtabai, Ramin . Receipt of depression treatment from general medical providers and specialty mental health providers. Psychiatric Services.
Full Text Options: DOI Worldcat Google Scholar
Export Options: RIS/EndNote
2016
Nguyen, Ngoc Nguyen,  Newhill, Christina E. The role of religiosity as a protective factor against marijuana use among African American, White, Asian, and Hispanic adolescents. Journal of Substance Use.
Full Text Options: DOI Worldcat Google Scholar
Export Options: RIS/EndNote
2016
Noyori-Corbett, Chie,  Sharma, Yasoda . Female juvenile violent behavior: Bonding systems and other mediating constructs. Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal. 33, (1), 25-37.
Full Text Options: DOI Worldcat Google Scholar
Export Options: RIS/EndNote
2016
Perry, Adam N.,  Westenbroek, Christel,  Becker, Jill B. Chapter 6 - Sex Differences and Addiction. Sex Differences in the Central Nervous System. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.
Full Text Options: DOI
Export Options: RIS/EndNote
2016
Sarabia, Stephanie Elias,  Martin, James I. Are baby boomer women unique? The moderating effect of birth cohort on age in substance use patterns during midlife. Journal of Women and Aging.
Full Text Options: DOI Worldcat Google Scholar
Export Options: RIS/EndNote
2016
Stanforth, E.T.,  Kostiuk, M.,  Garroitt, P.O. . Correlates of engaging in drug distribution in a national sample. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors.
Full Text Options: Worldcat Google Scholar
Export Options: RIS/EndNote

Variables