The Source for Crime and Justice Data

Relationship of Mental Disorder to Violent Behavior in the United States, 1983-1984 (ICPSR 9973)

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

This study investigates the relationship between mental disorder and violent behavior. Detailed interviews were conducted with inmates in the North Carolina prison system. Each respondent was given a psychological assessment using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, Version III. Conditions of particular interest were schizophrenia, mood disorders (depression and dysthymia), traumatic stress disorder, and alcohol disorders. The data supply information on the respondent's criminal history, psychological status at the time of interview, and history of rule infractions while incarcerated for the current offense. In addition to the psychological assessment, questions were also asked covering areas of general health status, criminal history, and drug and alcohol use. Demographic information includes age, education, marital status, and race.

Access Notes

  • These data are freely available.

Dataset(s)

DS0:  Study-Level Files
Documentation:
DS1:  Raw Data File - Download All Files (7.3 MB)
Data:
DS2:  Raw Data File for PC Users - Download All Files (7.9 MB)
Data:
ASCII
ASCII + SPSS Setup
DS4:  SAS Input Statement for Raw Data File for PC Users - Download All Files (1.5 MB)
Data:

ASCII + SAS Setup
DS5:  SAS Input Statements for Raw Data File for PC Users - Download All Files (1.5 MB)
Data:

ASCII + SAS Setup

Study Description

Citation

Collins, James J.,, Susan L. Bailey, Charles D. Phillips, and Amy Craddock. Relationship of Mental Disorder to Violent Behavior in the United States, 1983-1984. ICPSR09973-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1993. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09973.v1

Persistent URL:

Export Citation:

  • RIS (generic format for RefWorks, EndNote, etc.)
  • EndNote XML (EndNote X4.0.1 or higher)

Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Mental Health (1-R01-MH34885-01A1, and 86-15-CX-0034)
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   alcoholism, criminal histories, depression (psychology), health status, mental disorders, prison inmates, psychological evaluation, schizophrenia, violence

Geographic Coverage:   United States

Time Period:  

  • 1983-03--1984-09

Date of Collection:  

  • 1983-03--1984-09

Unit of Observation:   Individuals.

Universe:   Male criminal offenders in the United States.

Data Types:   survey data, and event/transaction data

Data Collection Notes:

A collection of SAS programs is available to create composite variables used in making the psychological assessments. The programs are available in hardcopy form only, upon request from ICPSR. Two Logical Record Length versions of the data are available. The first contains one record per case with a maximum line length of 5,455. The second, which is PC-compatible, contains six records per case with a maximum line length of 950.

Methodology

Study Purpose:   The Research Triangle Institute conducted this study to investigate the relationship between mental disorder and the propensity to engage in violent behavior. This work continues a stream of research on mental disorder and violence. However, in contrast to previous research, the authors gathered data on specific mental disorders. Interviews were conducted with male felons recently admitted to the North Carolina prison system. A major focus of the interviews was a detailed psychological assessment of each respondent. This was accomplished by use of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, Version III, and specialized computer software. Attention was given to conditions such as schizophrenia, mood disorders (depression and dysthymia), traumatic stress syndrome, and alcohol disorders. The authors investigated the relationship between these disorders and violent behavior occurring before an inmate's current incarceration. In addition, the authors gathered data to explore the relationship between mental disorder and an inmate's behavior while incarcerated. The dataset is comprised of both self-report data and criminal records.

Study Design:   Interviews were conducted at the five reception centers that process all male felons entering the North Carolina prison system. Interviews were conducted within a few days of the inmates' arrival by 14 professional survey interviewers and lasted approximately 90 minutes each. In order to make a psychological assessment of each respondent, the National Institute of Mental Health's Diagnostic Interview Schedule, Version III (DIS-III) was used in the interviews. The DIS-III was designed to be used by nonclinical personnel to aid in making psychiatric diagnoses. Official records were obtained detailing each respondent's arrest history prior to the current incarceration and rule violations while in prison subsequent to the current incarceration.

Sample:   Male prisoners entering North Carolina prisons between March and June 1983.

Data Source:

personal interviews, and arrest and incarceration records

Description of Variables:   A major portion of the interviews was devoted to gathering data for a psychological assessment of each respondent. Psychological conditions of interest were schizophrenia, mood disorders, traumatic stress syndrome, and alcohol disorders. Additional topics covered in the interviews included general health status, criminal history, drug and alcohol use, and demographic information. Arrest records provided information on the nature and timing of previous police contacts.

Response Rates:   A total of 1,327 inmates were eligible to be interviewed. Interviews were completed with 1,149 inmates (86.6 percent). Those not interviewed include 10.2 percent who refused to participate, 2.6 percent who were transferred before interviews could be conducted, and 0.6 percent who could not be interviewed because of physical, mental, or language limitations. Inmates who were not interviewed tended to be older and to have more serious criminal histories than those who were interviewed.

Presence of Common Scales:   None.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

Version History:

  • 2006-01-12 All files were removed from dataset 3 and flagged as study-level files, so that they will accompany all downloads.

Related Publications ?

Utilities

Metadata Exports

If you're looking for collection-level metadata rather than an individual metadata record, please visit our Metadata Records page.

Download Statistics