The Source for Crime and Justice Data

Hospital-Based Victim Assistance for Physically Injured Crime Victims in Charleston, South Carolina, 1990-1991 (ICPSR 6719) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

The central purpose of this study was to provide descriptive information about hospitalized crime victims. More specifically, patients' knowledge of victim services, the legal justice system, and victims' rights were explored through their use of medical and dental services. From July 1, 1990, to June 30, 1991, the project staff obtained daily reports from the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Admissions Office regarding new admissions to specified units. If patients granted permission, the staff member administered a Criminal Victimization Screening Schedule (CVSS) and asked permission to review the relevant portion of their medical charts. Patients were also asked if they would be willing to participate in interviews about their victimization. If so, they were given the Criminal Victimization Interview (CVI), a structured interview schedule developed for this study that included items on demographics, victim and assault characteristics, knowledge of victims' rights, and a post-traumatic stress disorder checklist. This information is contained in Part 1, Interview Data File. At the conclusion of the personal interviews, patients were referred to the Model Hospital Victim Assistance Program (MHVAP), which was developed for this project and which provided information, advocacy, crisis counseling, and post-discharge referral services to hospitalized crime victims and their families. The Follow-Up Criminal Victimization Interview (FUCVI) was administered to 30 crime victims who had participated in the study and who were successfully located 3 months after discharge from the hospital. The FUCVI included questions on health status, victim services utilization and satisfaction, and satisfaction with the criminal justice system. These data are found in Part 2, Follow-Up Data File.

Access Notes

  • These data are freely available.

Dataset(s)

DS0:  Study-Level Files
Documentation:
DS1:  Interview Data File - Download All Files (0.8 MB)
DS2:  Follow-Up Data File - Download All Files (0.6 MB)
DS4:  SAS Data Definition Statements for Interview Data - Download All Files (0.5 MB)
Data:

ASCII + SAS Setup
DS5:  SAS Data Definition Statements for Follow-Up Data - Download All Files (0.5 MB)
Data:

ASCII + SAS Setup

Study Description

Citation

Best, Connie L. Hospital-Based Victim Assistance for Physically Injured Crime Victims in Charleston, South Carolina, 1990-1991. ICPSR06719-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1996. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06719.v1

Persistent URL:

Export Citation:

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (90-IJ-CX-0029)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   counseling services, criminal justice system, dental health, health care services, health services utilization, hospitals, victim rights, victim services, victims

Geographic Coverage:   Charleston (South Carolina), South Carolina, United States

Time Period:  

  • 1990-07-01--1991-06-30

Date of Collection:  

  • 1990-07-01--1991-06-30

Unit of Observation:   Individuals.

Universe:   Adult patients aged 18 years or older hospitalized at the Medical University of South Carolina for crime-related physical injuries between July 1, 1990, and June 30, 1991.

Data Types:   survey data

Methodology

Study Purpose:   The central purpose of this investigation was to provide descriptive information about hospitalized crime victims. More specifically, this study had five objectives: (1) To provide an estimate of the number of seriously physically injured crime victims at the Medical University of South Carolina, (2) To develop an information packet for crime victims and families that would inform them about crime victims' compensation, social services, and victim assistance agencies/services for which they might qualify, as well as psychological services to be provided by this project, (3) For those individuals who were identified as crime victims, to assess specific information regarding the characteristics of the crime, characteristics of the victims, characteristics of the type and extent of injury, victims' knowledge of victim services and the criminal justice system, and psychological symptoms related to the crime, (4) To develop a Model Hospital Victim Assistance Program (MHVAP) to provide information, advocacy, crisis counseling, and post-discharge referral services to hospitalized crime victims and their families, and (5) To conduct a brief follow-up assessment with a sample of crime victims having been offered MHVAP services to determine: (a) their criminal justice system contact, progress, and satisfaction, (b) their utilization of social services including mental health and crime victim compensation, and (c) their satisfaction with MHVAP services.

Study Design:   From July 1, 1990, to June 30, 1991, the project staff obtained daily reports from the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Admissions Office regarding new admissions to specified units. For each new admission, charge nurses in each of the cooperating units were contacted by a staff member and asked if the current medical condition of the newly-admitted patient permitted a brief interview. For each patient whose condition permitted an interview, a staff member asked the patient if he or she would be willing to answer a few short questions about the events that produced the injuries. If a patient granted permission, the staff member administered the Criminal Victimization Screening Schedule (CVSS) and asked permission to review the relevant portion of the patient's medical chart. Patients were also asked if they would be willing to participate in interviews about their victimization. Ideally, the CVSS was administered to patients described above after one to two days following their admission. If they were not available after two days following admission (e.g., patient was in a coma), they were interviewed as soon as they were able to complete the procedure. For patients who had no prospect of ever being able to complete the CVSS or who died as a result of their injuries, an attempt was made to contact a close family member. If possible, family members were interviewed using a revised version of the CVSS. Patients who were identified as crime victims and who agreed to participate were administered the Criminal Victimization Interview (CVI) while hospitalized. At the conclusion of the interview, the Model Hospital Victim Assistance Program (MHVAP) developed for this project provided victims with information, assisted with referral to the prosecutor's office and/or police in their jurisdiction, provided a brief psychological intervention when indicated, and assisted with establishing future outpatient psychological follow-up. Other remaining sessions consisted of working directly with the victim to contact the appropriate criminal justice and victim service officials in their home districts, assisting with appropriate outpatient psychological follow-up for those individuals who would benefit from such services, and instructing victims in the techniques of specific crime-related psychological interventions. The Follow-Up Criminal Victimization Interview (FUCVI) was administered to 30 crime victims who had completed the CVI and who were successfully located three months after discharge from the hospital. The crime victims who were contacted for a follow-up interview also had to meet the following criteria: the crime occurred in the state of South Carolina, the victim was a resident of South Carolina at the time of the crime, and the victim resided in South Carolina at the time that the CVI was administered. Eligible victims were contacted for a telephone interview. The interviews lasted approximately 15 to 20 minutes.

Sample:   A total of 2,402 admissions to the surgery and trauma services at the Medical University of South Carolina Medical Center were screened for a possible crime-related hospital admission. Of these, 233 patients (9.7 percent) had injuries determined to be directly related to a criminal victimization. After leaving out patients who were unable or unwilling to be included in the survey, 99 patients remained

Data Source:

personal interviews and telephone interviews

Description of Variables:   The Criminal Victimization Interview (CVI), a structured interview schedule developed for this study, assessed patient demographic variables, information about the nature of the crime, knowledge of victim rights and services, knowledge of the criminal justice system, and psychological symptoms. The Follow-Up Criminal Victimization Interview (FUCVI) was administered three months after the CVI to provide information on respondents' physical health status, utilization of and satisfaction with victim services, satisfaction with the criminal justice system, knowledge of victim's rights, victim services, and the criminal justice system, and psychological symptoms.

Response Rates:   Of the 233 crime victims identified, 81 of the crime victims were discharged from the surgical and trauma units within 24 hours of admission and, therefore, were discharged too quickly to be interviewed. In addition, 26 of the identified victims were too sick to participate, 12 died on the units, and 3 were unavailable for the interview. Only 12 patients out of the 111 patients contacted refused to participate. Thus, 99 hospitalized crime victims were contacted and agreed to participate in this study (89 percent consent rate). There were 30 participants who were successfully located three months after discharge from the hospital who participated in the follow-up telephone interview.

Presence of Common Scales:   Some Likert-type scales were used.

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Standardized missing values.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

Version History:

  • 2006-01-12 All files were removed from dataset 3 and flagged as study-level files, so that they will accompany all downloads.
  • 2005-11-04 On 2005-03-14 new files were added to one or more datasets. These files included additional setup files as well as one or more of the following: SAS program, SAS transport, SPSS portable, and Stata system files. The metadata record was revised 2005-11-04 to reflect these additions.

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