The Source for Crime and Justice Data

Drugs and Police Response: Survey of Public Housing Residents in Denver, Colorado, 1989-1990 (ICPSR 6482) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

This data collection is the result of an evaluation of the NEPHU program, conducted by the Police Foundation under the sponsorship of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). In August 1989, the Bureau of Justice Assistance supported a grant in Denver, Colorado, to establish a special Narcotics Enforcement in Public Housing Unit (NEPHU) within the Denver Police Department. The goal of the Denver NEPHU was to reduce the availability of narcotics in and around the city's public housing areas by increasing drug arrests. NEPHU's six full-time officers made investigations and gathered intelligence leading to on-street arrests and search warrants. The unit also operated a special telephone Drug Hotline and met regularly with tenant councils in the developments to improve community relations. The program worked in cooperation with the Denver Housing Authority and the uniformed patrol division of the Denver Police Department, which increased levels of uniformed patrols to maintain high visibility in the project areas to deter conventional crime. Using a panel design, survey interviews were conducted with residents in the Quigg Newton and Curtis Park public housing units, focusing on events that occurred during the past six months. Respondents were interviewed during three time periods to examine the onset and persistence of any apparent program effects. In December 1989, interviews were completed with residents in 521 households. In June 1990, 422 respondents were interviewed in Wave 2. Wave 3 was conducted in December 1990 and included 423 respondents. In all, 642 individuals were interviewed, 283 of whom were interviewed for all three waves. Because of the evaluation's design, the data can be analyzed to reveal individual-level changes for the 283 respondents who were interviewed on all three occasions, and the data can also be used to determine a cross-section representation of the residents by including the 359 "new" persons interviewed during the course of the evaluation. Information collected includes years and months lived in the development, assessments of changes in the neighborhood, whether the respondent planned to stay in the development, interactions among residents, awareness of anti-drug programs, ranking of various problems in the development, concerns and reports of being a victim of various crimes, perceived safety of the development, assessment of drug use and availability, assessment of police activity and visibility, and personal contacts with police. The unit of analysis is the individual.

Access Notes

  • One or more data files in this study are set up in a non-standard format, such as card image format. Users may need help converting these files before they can be used for analysis.

  • These data are freely available.

Dataset(s)

DS1:  Data File - Download All Files (1.4 MB)
Documentation:
Data:
ASCII
ASCII + SPSS Setup
DS2:  SAS Data Definition Statements - Download All Files (0.4 MB)
Data:

ASCII + SAS Setup

Study Description

Citation

Annan, Sampson O., and Wesley G. Skogan. Drugs and Police Response: Survey of Public Housing Residents in Denver, Colorado, 1989-1990. ICPSR06482-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1995. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06482.v1

Persistent URL:

Export Citation:

  • RIS (generic format for RefWorks, EndNote, etc.)
  • EndNote XML (EndNote X4.0.1 or higher)

Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (89-DD-CX-0054)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   deterrence, drug law enforcement, drug law offenses, drug offenders, program evaluation, public housing

Geographic Coverage:   Colorado, Denver, United States

Time Period:  

  • 1989--1990

Date of Collection:  

  • 1989--1990

Unit of Observation:   Individuals

Universe:   All public housing developments in Denver, Colorado, that were targeted by the NEPHU program.

Data Types:   survey data

Data Collection Notes:

Additional data discussed in the Final Report are not part of this release. Specifically, data collected from official records in Denver are not available as part of this collection, nor are data resulting from an evaluation of a NEPHU program in New Orleans.

Methodology

Study Purpose:   This data collection is the result of an evaluation of the NEPHU program, conducted by the Police Foundation under the sponsorship of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). In August 1989, the Bureau of Justice Assistance supported a grant in Denver, Colorado, to establish a special Narcotics Enforcement in Public Housing Unit (NEPHU) within the Denver Police Department. The NEPHU program was primarily enforcement-oriented and employed traditional policing methods, but the unit focused new energy and resources on tackling drug problems in Denver's public housing units. The NEPHU's six full-time officers (one lieutenant, one sergeant, and four detectives) made investigations and gathered intelligence leading to on-street arrests and search warrants. The unit also operated a special telephone Drug Hotline and met regularly with tenant councils in the developments to improve community relations. The program worked in cooperation with the Denver Housing Authority and the uniformed patrol division of the Denver Police Department, which increased levels of uniformed patrols to maintain high visibility in these areas, to deter conventional crime. The goal of the Denver NEPHU was to reduce the availability of narcotics in and around the city's public housing areas by increasing drug arrests. It was hoped that this would, in turn, lower the incidence of both violent crimes and property crimes, reduce residents' fear of crime, and increase residents' confidence in the police.

Study Design:   With the assistance of the Denver Housing Authority, two matched housing developments were selected in which to monitor the progress of the NEPHU program. The Curtis Park Homes development is located in northeast Denver. The population of this area of Denver is predominantly American-born, of Mexican ancestry, although the residents of the Curtis Park Homes are overwhelmingly African-American. The Quigg Newton Homes development is located in north Denver and has been predominantly Hispanic since the 1950s. Using a panel design, survey interviews were conducted with residents in these housing units, focusing on events that occurred during the past six months. Respondents were interviewed during three time periods to examine of the onset and persistence of any apparent program effects. In December 1989, attempts were made to contact all households in the two target developments. In June 1990, second-wave interviewers revisited units where Wave 1 interviews had been successfully completed and reinterviewed the original Wave 1 respondents if they still lived in the units. New respondents were solicited if the Wave 1 respondents had moved from the households. The third wave of the survey was conducted in December 1990. Interviewers again revisited all the units in which interviews had been completed in Wave 1, selecting replacement respondents if those interviewed in the past had left the households. In all, 642 individuals were interviewed, 283 of whom were interviewed for all three waves. A total of 1,366 interviews were conducted. Because of the evaluation's design, the data can be analyzed in two different ways. First, responses by the 283 respondents who were interviewed on all three occasions can be tracked to reveal individual-level changes in experiences and opinions during 1990. Second, because of people moving in and out of the projects during the course of the year, 359 "new" persons living in the target developments were interviewed during the course of the evaluation. By including them, each wave of interviews also produced more representative cross-sections of the residents of Curtis Park and Quigg Newton at each point in time.

Sample:   Two matched housing developments in Denver were chosen. Out of 751 households in the two housing developments, interviews were completed with residents in 521 households in Wave 1. Of these, 422 households were reinterviewed in Wave 2, and 423 were reinterviewed in Wave 3. New respondents were solicited from the households if the original respondents no longer lived there.

Data Source:

personal interviews

Description of Variables:   Information collected includes years and months lived in the development, assessments of changes in the neighborhood, whether the respondent planned to stay in the development, interactions among residents, awareness of anti-drug programs, ranking of various problems in the development, concerns and reports of being a victim of various crimes, perceived safety of the development, assessment of drug use and availability, assessment of police activity and visibility, and personal contacts with police.

Response Rates:   Not applicable.

Presence of Common Scales:   Several Likert-like scales were used.

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Performed consistency checks.
  • Standardized missing values.
  • Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

Related Publications (see Notes)

Utilities

Metadata Exports

If you're looking for collection-level metadata rather than an individual metadata record, please visit our Metadata Records page.

Download Statistics