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Nature and Correlates of Domestic Violence Among Female Arrestees in San Diego, California, 2000-2001 (ICPSR 3873) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

This study sought to examine the incidence and prevalence of domestic violence among female arrestees. The data for this research were collected in conjunction with the National Institute of Justice's Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) programs. Female arrestees in San Diego, California, who had completed the ADAM interview and provided a urine specimen were asked if they would be willing to answer an additional set of questions concerning their experience with domestic violence. Respondents were asked a series of questions about the types of abuse they experienced and a host of supplemental questions detailing the abusive incidents they experienced in their lifetime and in the last 12 months.

Access Notes

  • One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions ; consult the restrictions note to learn more. You can apply online for access to the data. A login is required to apply for access.

    Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Dataset(s)

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Study Description

Citation

Pennell, Susan, and Cynthia Burke. NATURE AND CORRELATES OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AMONG FEMALE ARRESTEES IN SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA, 2000-2001. ICPSR version. San Diego, CA: San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) [producer], 2003. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2004. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03873.v1

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2000-WT-VX-0001)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   ADAM/DUF Program, domestic violence, emotional abuse, female offenders, sexual abuse, substance abuse, victimization, victims, violence against women

Smallest Geographic Unit:   None.

Geographic Coverage:   California, United States

Time Period:  

  • 2000--2001

Date of Collection:  

  • 2000-08--2001-05

Unit of Observation:   individuals

Universe:   All female persons arrested and booked on local and state charges (i.e., not federal and out-of-county charges) in San Diego, California, 2000-2001.

Data Types:   survey data

Data Collection Notes:

(1) Users are strongly encouraged to obtain copies of the "Methodology Guide for ADAM" and the "Analytic Guide for ADAM" from the ADAM Web site: http://www.adam-nij.net/index.asp. (2) This research project also had the objective of comparing characteristics and life experiences of arrestees who reported domestic violence victimization within the past 12 months to those of a control group of victims who were deemed "shelter clients," or in other words, abused victims seeking shelter. This data collection does not contain the data collected from the control group. Users are strongly encouraged to obtain the Final Report for additional information concerning the results and data collections involving the control group. (3) The user guide, codebook, and data collection instrument are provided by ICPSR as Portable Document Format (PDF) files. The PDF file format was developed by Adobe Systems Incorporated and can be accessed using PDF reader software, such as the Adobe Acrobat Reader. Information on how to obtain a copy of the Acrobat Reader is provided on the ICPSR Web site.

Methodology

Study Purpose:   The actual incidence and prevalence of intimate partner violence are difficult to discern due to underreporting in official statistics and methodological differences in research studies gathering such information. This study addresses partner violence by examining the incidence and prevalence of domestic violence within a different sub-group of victims -- female arrestees. The research objectives were (1) to compare arrestees who reported having experienced domestic violence with arrestees who reported never having experienced partner abuse, and (2) to examine the association between types and severity of domestic violence victimization and substance use as reported by arrestees.

Study Design:   The data for this research were collected in conjunction with the National Institute of Justice's Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) programs. At the time of this study's release, the ADAM program was operational in approximately 35 cities nationwide, providing national and local profiles of drug use within arrestee populations and the monitoring of drug use patterns. An extension and refinement of the previous Drug Use Forecasting (DUF) program (see DRUG USE FORECASTING IN 24 CITIES IN THE UNITED STATES, 1987-1997 [ICPSR 9477]), the ADAM program (see ARRESTEE DRUG ABUSE MONITORING (ADAM) PROGRAM IN THE UNITED STATES, 1999 [ICPSR 2994], 2000 [ICPSR 3270], and 2001 [ICPSR 3688]) is the United States government's primary source of information on drug use among arrestees, and is one of the primary research tools on drug use, crime, and other social indicators. Quarterly interviews with arrestees selected using probability-based (for males) and convenience sampling (for females) were conducted in jails and detention facilities at each ADAM site. Urine samples were also collected and tested for a core panel of drugs that included cocaine, methamphetamine, marijuana, and opiates. Because the drug screen could not detect drugs beyond 72 hours after use, only arrestees who had been incarcerated 48 hours or less were eligible for participation. The ADAM interview provided demographic and descriptive data including race, age, marital status, source of income, screens for substance abuse and dependency, treatment history, arrest and incarceration experiences, and participation in local drug markets. At the conclusion of the interview, respondents were asked to provide a urine specimen. For the current study, when the ADAM process was completed, women were asked to answer questions about domestic violence. The domestic violence addendum was administered as part of the ADAM data collection in San Diego, California, from August 2000 through May 2001. Prior to the introduction of the domestic violence interview, ADAM staff participated in a three-hour training session conducted by a victim advocate. Training included definitions of abuse, theories about domestic violence, the potential for re-victimization through the use of the interview, and discussion of referral agencies. Definitions of abuse, including physical, mental, and emotional abuse, developed by the Centers of Disease Control were read to the respondents for clarity. Questions used in the interview were developed using a modified Revised Conflict Tactics Scale (Straus, 2000).

Sample:   The domestic violence addendum was administered to all female arrestees in San Diego, California, who had completed the ADAM interview and provided a urine specimen and were willing to answer additional questions concerning their experience with domestic violence. During the ADAM collection phase, a total of 564 face sheets were completed for potential interviews. Of these, 273 were still in the facility available for an interview. Of these, 255 agreed to an ADAM interview and provided a urine sample. Of these, 181 participated in the ADAM domestic violence addendum. Please see ARRESTEE DRUG ABUSE MONITORING (ADAM) PROGRAM IN THE UNITED STATES, 1999 [ICPSR 2994], 2000 [ICPSR 3270], and 2001 [ICPSR 3688] for additional information on the sampling frame used to collect the ADAM data.

Data Source:

The ADAM domestic violence addendum, administered by a survey, was given to female arrestees in the sample who had completed the ADAM interview, provided a urine specimen, and were willing to answer additional questions concerning their experience with domestic violence.

Description of Variables:   Respondents were asked a series of questions about the types of intimate partner physical abuse (e.g., scratching, pushing, throwing, biting, choking, punching, burning, and hair-pulling), emotional abuse (things that made the victim feel humiliated, controlled, isolated, or embarrassed), and sexual abuse they experienced in their lifetime and in the last 12 months, the frequencies of the abuse, what if any types of weapons were used in the abuse (e.g., gun, knife, brass knuckles, or mouth), whether the respondent received medical treatment and in what manner (from paramedics, doctor, at a clinic or urgent care facility, or hospital), whether there were witnesses to any of the abuse, whether a restraining order was ever obtained and if so what type was obtained (emergency, temporary, or permanent), and whether the abusive partner complied with the conditions of the order. Respondents were also asked about various substances (alcohol, marijuana, crack/cocaine, heroin, PCP, LSD, methadone, crystal meth, and prescribed medications) that the abuser may have taken and whether any substances were ever taken prior to any abuse incident or in the most recent abusive incident. The abuser's gender, race, age at time of incident, and highest grade completed are also included along with variables pertaining to any physical, emotional, or sexual abuse experienced by the abuser as a child.

Response Rates:   The ADAM domestic violence addendum was completed by all female arrestees who agreed to participate in the interview.

Presence of Common Scales:   Revised Conflict Tactics Scale.

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Standardized missing values.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

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