Repeat and Multiple Violent Victimization: Nested Analysis of Men and Women Using the National Violence Against Women Survey (NVAWS), United States, 1994-1996 (ICPSR 36535)

Principal Investigator(s): Cares, Alison, Assumption College

Summary:

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they there received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except of the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompany readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collections and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

This study was a secondary analysis of National Violence Against Women Survey (NVAWS) data from Violence and Threats of Violence Against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996 (ICPSR 2566 - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02566.v1). This analysis examined the levels and patterns of repeat and multiple violent victimization, and their effects. Distributed here are the codes used to create the datasets and preform the secondary analysis. Please refer to the User Guide, distributed with this study, for more information.

Access Notes

  • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

Dataset(s)

Dataset - Download All Files (1.033 MB)
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Study Description

Citation

Cares, Alison. Repeat and Multiple Violent Victimization: Nested Analysis of Men and Women Using the National Violence Against Women Survey (NVAWS), United States, 1994-1996. ICPSR36535-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2016-09-30. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36535.v1

Persistent URL: https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36535.v1

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2013-IJ-CX-0036)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:    abuse, assault, assault and battery, child abuse, domestic assault, domestic violence, emotional abuse, fear, fear of crime, mental health, rape, sex offenses, sexual abuse, sexual assault, stalking, threats, victimization, victims

Smallest Geographic Unit:    United States

Geographic Coverage:    United States

Time Period:   

  • 1994-11--1996-05

Date of Collection:   

  • 1995-11--1996-05

Unit of Observation:    Individual

Universe:    All men and women in the United States 18 years of age or older.

Data Type(s):    program source code

Data Collection Notes:

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

The SPSS code distributed here alters existing data from the National Violence Against Women Survey (NVAWS). In order to use this code users must download data files from the Violence and Threats of Violence Against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996 (ICPSR 2566 - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02566.v1).

Methodology

Study Purpose:   

The purpose of the study was to examine the levels and patterns of repeat and multiple violent victimization and their effects by using National Violence Against Women Survey (NVAWS) data. The specific goals of the study were to explore the following:

  1. Prevalence of single, repeat, and multiple victimization.
  2. Patterns of repeat and multiple victimization, including if some types of victimization are more likely to be repeated than others.
  3. Differences in victim profiles between single, repeat, and multiple victims.
  4. Differences in outcomes for single, repeat, and multiple victims.
  5. Differences in incidents between single incidents and repeat/multiple incidents.
  6. Differences in these patterns by gender.

Study Design:    The National Violence Against Women Survey (NVAWS) was chosen as it was a large nationally representative sample of men and women that collected detailed victimization information about multiple types of victimization over a lifetime, including physical assault, and not limited to intimate partner violence, with low levels of missing data. The NVAWS data was obtained from the ICPSR release of Violence and Threats of Violence Against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996 (http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02566.v1). Male and female datasets were combined and then information from across victimization incidents were used for each respondent to determine if they suffered single repeat, or multiple types of victimization in adulthood.

Sample:    Users should consult the Violence and Threats of Violence Against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996 (ICPSR 2566 - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02566.v1) for sampling information.

Time Method:    Cross-sectional

Mode of Data Collection:    telephone interview

Data Source:

Violence and Threats of Violence Against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996 (ICPSR 2566 - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02566.v1)

Description of Variables:   

Person level data (n=16000) contains 2297 variables. For the first 1852 variables, please see Violence and Threats of Violence Against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996 (ICPSR 2566 - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02566.v1) for details. For each type of victimization incidents there could be up to six specific perpetrators. The remaining 445 variable are on responses to:

  • Sexual assault

    Whether victimized by sexual assault; years since sexual assault with a specific perpetrator; age when only sexual assault incident occurred with a specific perpetrator; years since first and most recent sexual assault with specific perpetrator; age at time of first and most recent sexual assault; sexual assault by specific perpetrator in childhood and/or adulthood; repeated sexual assault in adulthood by specific perpetrator; sexual assault/repeated sexual assault by more than one perpetrator; and sexual assault/repeated sexual assault by more than one perpetrator in adulthood.

  • Physical assault

    Physical assault in childhood by parent or guardian; physical assault in adulthood; physical assault by specific perpetrator; years since only physical assault incident with specific perpetrator; age when only physical assault with specific perpetrator; years since first and most recent physical assault with specific perpetrator; age when first and most recent physical assault incident with specific perpetrator; physical assault by a specific perpetrator in childhood and/or adulthood; repeated physical assault by specific perpetrator in adulthood; repeated physical assault by more than one perpetrator in adulthood; and repeated physical assault victimization of any type in adulthood.

  • Stalking

    Whether victimized by stalking; was very frightened by specific perpetrator; believed would be seriously harmed when harassed by specific perpetrator; stalked by specific perpetrator; years since first stalking incident and most recent stalking incident by specific perpetrator; age since first stalking incident and most recent stalking incident by specific perpetrator; staking by specific perpetrator in adulthood; stalking by more than one perpetrator in adulthood; and repeated stalking victimization of any type in adulthood.

  • Threat

    Whether threatened with harm or death; threatened by specific perpetrator; years since only threat happened with specific perpetrator; age when only threat happened with specific perpetrator; years since first and most recent threat incident with specific perpetrator; age when first and most recent threat incident occurred with specific perpetrator; threatened by specific perpetrator in childhood and/or adulthood; repeated threat incidents in adulthood by specific perpetrator; threatened by more than one perpetrator in adulthood; and repeated threat victimization of any type in adulthood.

  • Respondent details

    Whether victimized at least once in childhood/adulthood; age at time of interview; repeat victimization by same perpetrator in adulthood; repeat victimization by more than one perpetrator in adulthood; indicator on no, single, repeat, multiple, and both type of repeat victimization in adulthood; number of types of victimization experienced; how respondent felt in the past week, such as feeling nervous, happy, and tired; depressive symptoms summed scale; alcohol and drug use in the past 2 weeks, month, and 12 months; race, education, income, and household income; types of medical coverage; employment status; household composition; if respondent suffers disability from injury, health condition, and mental health condition; number of types of victimization by each type of perpetrator to the respondent, such as current spouse, biological parents, ex-spouse or partner, brother, uncle, other male/female relative, same gender current and ex-partners, stranger, acquaintance, and child; if there was at least one victimization by each type of perpetrator to the respondent; number of types of perpetrators across victimizations; indicator of valid or missing on adult victimization; and at least one victimization by a current or ex-spouse or partner.

Incident level data (n=7867) contains 333 variables on: respondent id number and gender; number of times victimized by perpetrator; if incident happened while still in a relationship; when was the first time, most recent time, and number of times in the last twelve months that the incident occurred; where and what trigged this incident; was respondent and/or perpetrator on drugs or alcohol at the time, if respondent got pregnant and if so what was the outcome; was a weapon used; was respondent or someone close to respondent threatened; was respondent harmed or killed; was respondent injured; did respondent receive medical, dental, or mental health care and if so how many times and how were the costs covered; days taken off from various activities due to the incident; was incident reported to police, if not why, and outcome; did respondent talk to others about the incident, if so whom; age at victimization; was there multiple sexual assaults by perpetrator and which perpetrator if more than one; was it a sexual assault incident; how was the perpetrator physically violent towards respondent; was incident related to a previous incident; who used physical force first; why respondent started using physical force; was respondent pregnant at time of incident; was this physical assault by this perpetrator; was respondent a child or adult at time of physical assault; what exactly did the perpetrator do; did respondent think perpetrator was stalking respondent; how frightened was respondent and opinions on why perpetrator does these things; did someone else help respondent and if so whom; measures respondent took and outcome; was respondent stalked by this perpetrator as child/adult; was this a threat incident and were there multiple threats; relationship of respondent to perpetrator by type, such as current spouse, biological parents, ex-spouse or partner, brother, uncle, other male/female relative, same gender current and ex-partners, male/female stranger, male/female acquaintance, and child; number of types of victimization by perpetrator type; indicator of at least one victimization by perpetrator type; number of types of perpetrators across victimizations; if victimized by one type of perpetrator; and number of types of victimization by current or ex-spouse or live in partner.

Response Rates:    Users should consult the Violence and Threats of Violence Against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996 (ICPSR 2566 - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02566.v1) for response rate information.

Presence of Common Scales:    Users should consult the Violence and Threats of Violence Against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996 (ICPSR 2566 - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02566.v1) for scales information.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:   2016-09-30

Utilities

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