The National Police Research Platform, Phase 2 [United States], 2013-2015 (ICPSR 36497)

Principal Investigator(s): Rosenbaum, Dennis P, University of Illinois at Chicago; Hartnett, Susan M, University of Illinois at Chicago; Skogan, Wesley G, Northwestern University; Mastrofski, Stephen D, George Mason University; Cordner, Gary, Kutztown University; Fridell, Lorie, University of South Florida; McCarty, William, University of Illinois at Chicago; McDevitt, Jack, Northeastern University; Alderden, Megan, St. Xavier University

Summary:

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they there received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except of the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompany readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collections and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

The purpose of the study was to implement a "platform-based" methodology for collecting data about police organizations and the communities they serve with the goals of generating in-depth standardized information about police organizations, personnel and practices and to help move policing in the direction of evidence-based "learning-organizations" by providing judicious feedback to police agencies and policy makers. The research team conducted three web-based Law Enforcement Organizations (LEO) surveys of sworn and civilian law enforcement employees (LEO Survey A Data, n=22,765; LEO Survey B Data, n=15,825; and LEO Survey C Data, n=16,483). The sample was drawn from the 2007 Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS) database. Agencies with 100 to 3,000 sworn police personnel were eligible for participation. To collect data for the Police-Community Interaction (PCI) survey (PCI Data, n=16,659), each week department employees extracted names and addresses of persons who had recent contact with a police officer because of a reported crime incident, traffic accident or traffic stop. Typically, the surveys were completed within two to four weeks of the encounter.

Access Notes

  • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions ; consult the restrictions note to learn more. You can apply online for access to the restricted-use data. A login is required to apply.

    Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reason for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

    Any public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

Dataset(s)

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Study Description

Citation

Rosenbaum, Dennis P, Susan M Hartnett, Wesley G Skogan, Stephen D Mastrofski, Gary Cordner, Lorie Fridell, William McCarty, Jack McDevitt, and Megan Alderden. The National Police Research Platform, Phase 2 [United States], 2013-2015. ICPSR36497-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2016-09-29. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36497.v1

Persistent URL: https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36497.v1

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2008-DN-BX-0005)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:    law enforcement agencies, leadership, police, police citizen interactions, police community relations, police departments, police officers, procedural justice, stress

Smallest Geographic Unit:    jurisdiction

Geographic Coverage:    United States

Time Period:   

  • 2013-07--2013-11 (Law Enforcement Organization Survey A)
  • 2013-09--2014-01 (Law Enforcement Organization Survey B)
  • 2014-10--2015-02 (Law Enforcement Organization Survey C)
  • 2013--2014 (Police-Community Interaction Survey)

Date of Collection:   

  • 2013-07--2013-11 (Law Enforcement Organization Survey A)
  • 2013-09--2014-01 (Law Enforcement Organization Survey B)
  • 2014-10--2015-02 (Law Enforcement Organization Survey C)
  • 2013--2014 (Police-Community Interaction Survey)

Unit of Observation:    Individual, police agency

Universe:    The universe for the Law Enforcement Organizations (LEO) surveys was all law enforcement agencies in the United States with between 100 and 3,000 sworn personnel between 2013 and 2015. The universe for the Police-Community Interaction (PCI) survey was any person in the United States who had contact with a police officer from an enforcement agency in the LEO sample because of a reported crime incident, traffic accident or traffic stop between 2013 and 2014.

Data Type(s):    survey data

Data Collection Notes:

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they there received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except of the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompany readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collections and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

Phase I of the National Police Research Platform project is available as ICPSR 34518 (http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34518v1).

Methodology

Study Purpose:    The purpose of the study was to implement a "platform-based" methodology for collecting data about police organizations and the communities they serve with the goals of generating in-depth standardized information about police organizations, personnel and practices and to help move policing in the direction of evidence-based "learning-organizations" by providing judicious feedback to police agencies and policy makers.

Study Design:   

In Phase II of the National Police Research Platform (NPRP) project, the research team conducted three Law Enforcement Organizations (LEO) surveys of sworn and civilian law enforcement employees (LEO Survey A Data, n=22,765; LEO Survey B Data, n=15,825; and LEO Survey C Data, n=16,483). Web surveys were administered using Qualtrics software. All sworn and civilian employees were invited by email to participate. Occasional reminder emails were sent to employees by their agency heads during the survey field period, which lasted about 30 days.

To collect data for the Police-Community Interaction (PCI) survey (PCI Data, n=16,659), each week department employees extracted names and addresses of persons who had recent contact with a police officer because of a reported crime incident, traffic accident or traffic stop. The chief of police or sheriff then sent a letter to those individuals encouraging them to evaluate their encounter with the officer, either online or via automated telephone response. Typically, the surveys were completed within two to four weeks of the encounter.

Sample:   

For the Law Enforcement Organizations (LEO) surveys, participating agencies were recruited from a random sample of police and sheriff's offices. The sample was drawn from the 2007 Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS) database. Agencies with 100 to 3,000 sworn police personnel were eligible for participation. Organizations were sampled to fill strata defined by region of the country and agency size. One hundred and one agencies participated in the LEO A (LEO Survey A Data, n= 22,765) survey. Of these same agencies, 98 participated in the LEO B (LEO Survey B Data, n=15,825) survey approximately two months later, and 89 participated in the LEO C (LEO Survey C Data, n=16,483) survey approximately one year later. A total of 55,073 surveys were collected (11,875 civilian and 43,198 sworn) across the three waves of surveys.

The Police-Community Interaction (PCI) survey (PCI Data, n= 16,659) was implemented on a national scale with 54 of the 100 Platform agencies. Of these, 47 were from the random sample and seven were from the nonrandom sample. The participating agencies varied in size: 19 agencies had 180 or fewer sworn employees, 16 had between 181 and 500 sworn employees and 18 had 501 or more sworn employees.

Time Method:    Cross-sectional , Longitudinal

Weight:    None

Mode of Data Collection:    telephone audio computer-assisted self interview (TACASI), web-based survey

Description of Variables:   

Law Enforcement Organizations Survey A (LEO Survey A Data, 147 variables, n=22,765) includes variables on job satisfaction, supervision and work culture. Respondent demographic variables include age, gender, race, formal education, and job assignment.

Law Enforcement Organizations Survey B (LEO Survey B Data, 128 variables, n=15,825) includes variables on procedural justice approaches used by the agency, supervision, stress and well-being, and interaction with the community. Respondent demographic variables include age, gender, race, formal education, and military service.

Law Enforcement Organizations Survey C (LEO Survey C Data, 188 variables n=16,483) includes variables on communication and innovation, supervision, workplace culture, job satisfaction and stress, health and well-being. Respondent demographic variables include age, gender, race, formal education, and job assignment.

The Police-Community Interaction Survey (PCI Data, 73 variables, n=16,659) includes demographic variables (age, race, gender, and homeownership), variables asking about the recent contact the respondent had with the police including type of incident, the respondent's role in the incident, the relationship between the respondent and the victim, and if an arrest was made. Additional variables asked if the respondent felt the officer was polite, fair, objective, if the officer seemed concerned about the respondent's feeling during the incident, if the officer answered any questions the respondent had or explained what would happen next, and if the respondent felt the officer acted professionally.

Response Rates:   

For the Law Enforcement Organizations (LEO) surveys, a total of 53,670 surveys were collected (11,948 civilian and 41,722 sworn) across the three waves of surveys. The mean agency response rate was 37.1 percent for sworn personnel and 36.2 percent for civilians. The first wave of the survey saw the highest participation; subsequent waves had slightly lower response rates.

Response rates for the Police-Community Interaction (PCI) survey varied by agency. The mean response rate for agencies with 180 or fewer sworn employees was 7.75 percent, while the mean response rate for agencies with 181 to 500 sworn employees was 6.27 percent and the mean response rate for agencies with more than 500 sworn employees was 4.78 percent. Across all categories, the mean response rate was 6.29 percent.

Presence of Common Scales:    None

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:   2016-09-29

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