Is Burglary a Crime of Violence? An Analysis of National Data 1998-2007 [United States] (ICPSR 34971)

Principal Investigator(s): Kopp, Phillip, The Graduate Center, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY; Culp, Richard, The Graduate Center, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY; McCoy, Candace, The Graduate Center, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY

Summary:

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

This study was a secondary analysis of data from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and National Incidents Based Reporting System (NIBRS) for the period 1998-2007. The analysis calculates two separate measures of the incidents of violence that occurred during burglaries. The study addressed the following research questions:

Is burglary a violent crime?

  • Are different levels of violence associated with residential versus nonresidential burglaries?
  • How frequently is a household member present during a residential burglary?
  • How frequently does violence occur in the commission of a burglary?
  • What forms does burglary-related violence take?
  • Are there differences in rates of violence between attempted and completed burglaries?

What constitutes the crime of burglary in current statutory law?

  • How do the federal government and the various states define burglary (grades and elements)?
  • Does statutory law comport with empirical observations of what the typical characteristics of acts of burglary are?

The SPSS code distributed here alters an existing dataset drawn from pre-existing studies. In order to use this code users must first create the original data file drawn from National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and National Incidents Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data from the period of 1998-2007. All data used for this study are publicly available through ICPSR. See the variable description section for a comprehensive list of, and direct links to, all datasets used to create this original dataset.

Access Notes

  • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

Dataset(s)

Dataset - Download All Files (0.627 MB)

Study Description

Citation

Kopp, Phillip, Richard Culp, and Candace McCoy. Is Burglary a Crime of Violence? An Analysis of National Data 1998-2007 [United States]. ICPSR34971-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2016-09-22. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34971.v1

Persistent URL: https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34971.v1

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2010-IJ-CX-0009)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:    burglary, federal offenses, nonviolent crime, policy, violence, violent crime

Smallest Geographic Unit:    United States

Geographic Coverage:    United States

Time Period:   

  • 1998--2007

Date of Collection:   

  • 2010--2011

Unit of Observation:    Criminal incidents of burglary.

Universe:    Burglary related incidents in the United States from 1998-2007.

Data Type(s):    program source code

Data Collection Notes:

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

The SPSS code distributed here alters an existing dataset drawn from pre-existing studies. In order to use this code users must first create the original data file drawn from National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and National Incidents Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data from the period of 1998-2007. All data used for this study are publicly available through ICPSR. See the variable description section for a comprehensive list of, and direct links to, all datasets used to create this original dataset.

Methodology

Study Purpose:    This study analyzed the conditions present during violent burglaries as reported in National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and National Incidents Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data as well as the state and federal definitions and statutes regarding burglary.

Study Design:   

The present study expands, in three ways, upon previous studies of burglaries conducted by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) in 1985 and 2010:

  1. The present study looks at non-residential burglaries as well as residential burglaries.
  2. The present study looks at a ten year time span (1998-2007).
  3. The present study uses police incident data reported under the National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS) which is part of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Reporting Program as well as survey data from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).

Sample:    Users should consult the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and the National Incidents Based Reporting System (NIBRS) for sampling information.

Time Method:    Time Series

Weight:    Users should consult the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and the National Incidents Based Reporting System (NIBRS) for weighting information.

Data Source:

National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS).

National Incidents Based Reporting System (NIBRS).

Description of Variables:   

This study uses variables from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and National Incidents Based Reporting System (NIBRS).

Seven NCVS variables were used and two additional variables were created from NCVS data. The variables include data on who was present during the burglary, whether the offender had a weapon, if there were injuries reported, whether the offender had a right to be at the location, whether the offender actually got inside, whether there was evidence of broken entry and the type of crime committed.

Additionally, there were four variables used from NIBRS data that show whether the offense was completed or just attempted, the most severe offense that occurred, where the offense occurred and whether the offender had a weapon.

Uniformed Crime Report (UCR) codes were used for recoding variables from NIBRS and NCVS. The variables occurred concurrently for ten years (1998-2007) and all ten years were used for analysis. An SPSS syntax file and a list of the variables used from NIBRS and NCVS as well as how variables were recoded is released with this study.

All data used for this study are publicly available through ICPSR. Below is a list of each year of the NCVS and NIBRS data used for this study as well as the ICPSR study numbers and URL paths to those data.

1998

  • NCVS (ICPSR 22923) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22923.v1
  • NIBRS (ICPSR 22883) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22883.v2

1999

  • NCVS (ICPSR 22922) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22922.v1
  • NIBRS (ICPSR 22884) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22884.v2

2000

  • NCVS (ICPSR 22921) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22921.v1
  • NIBRS (ICPSR 04700) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04700.v2

2001

  • NCVS (ICPSR 22920) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22920.v2
  • NIBRS (ICPSR 4693) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04693.v2

2002

  • NCVS (ICPSR 22902) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22902.v2
  • NIBRS (ICPSR 4692) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04692.v2

2003

  • NCVS (ICPSR 22901) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22901.v2
  • NIBRS (ICPSR 4676) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04676.v2

2004

  • NCVS (ICPSR 22900) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22900.v2
  • NIBRS (ICPSR 4485) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04485.v2

2005

  • NCVS (ICPSR 22746) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22746.v2
  • NIBRS (ICPSR 20303) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR20303.v2

2006

  • NCVS (ICPSR 22560) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22560.v3
  • NIBRS (ICPSR 23541) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR23541.v2

2007

  • NCVS (ICPSR 25141) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR25141.v3
  • NIBRS (ICPSR 25341) http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR25141.v3

Response Rates:    Users should consult the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and the National Incidents Based Reporting System (NIBRS) for response rate information.

Presence of Common Scales:    Users should consult the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and the National Incidents Based Reporting System (NIBRS) for scale information.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:   2016-09-22

Utilities

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