The Source for Crime and Justice Data

Effects of Intimate Partner Violence on the Workplace in the United States, 2005-2008 (ICPSR 26041)

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

This research, which was conducted in two phases, explored the effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on the workplace between 2005 and 2008. Phase One (Dataset 1, Phase One Data) examined the prevalence of IPV among employed individuals, how IPV affects the personal and professional well-being of employees, and its costs for employers. Researchers focused on two research questions:

  • Does IPV affect employees, and, if so, how?
  • What is the impact of IPV on organizations?

Phase Two (Dataset 2, Phase Two Data) focused more specifically on the interactions between employed IPV victims and their coworkers, focusing on the following questions:

  • Does work-related social support have positive effects on the well-being, attitudes, and behaviors of employed IPV victims?
  • How and when will coworkers provide assistance to IPV victims at work?
  • When and to whom will IPB victims disclose their victimization at work?
  • What organizational conditions are associated with stronger feelings of hopefulness on the part of employed IPB victims?

Access Notes

  • One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions ; consult the restrictions note to learn more. You can apply online for access to the data. A login is required to apply for access. (How to apply.)

    Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Dataset(s)

DS0:  Study-Level Files
Documentation:
DS1:  Phase One Data
Download:
No downloadable data files available.
DS2:  Phase Two Data
Download:
No downloadable data files available.

Study Description

Citation

Reeves, Carol, and Anne O'Leary-Kelly. Effects of Intimate Partner Violence on the Workplace in the United States, 2005-2008. ICPSR26041-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research[distributor], 2014-06-30. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR26041.v1

Persistent URL:

Export Citation:

  • RIS (generic format for RefWorks, EndNote, etc.)
  • EndNote XML (EndNote X4.0.1 or higher)

Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2003-RD-CX-0021)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   domestic violence, economic behavior, intimate partner violence, work environment

Smallest Geographic Unit:   state

Geographic Coverage:   United States

Time Period:  

  • 2005-06--2008-08

Date of Collection:  

  • 2005-06--2008-08

Unit of Observation:   Individual

Universe:   For dataset 1 (Phase One Data) the universe was all employees who worked in three midsized business organizations headquartered in a southern state between 2005 and 2008. For dataset 2 (Phase Two Data) the universe was all employees who worked in a midsized financial services institution headquartered in a southern state between 2005 and 2008.

Data Types:   survey data

Data Collection Notes:

According to the Final Report, Phase Two should include 2,751 cases. However, the data file includes 2,750 cases.

Methodology

Study Purpose:   The purpose of this study was to research the effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on the workplace. Phase One examined the prevalence of IPV among employed individuals, how IPV affects the personal and professional well-being of employees, and its costs for employers. Phase Two focused more specifically on the interactions between employed IPV victims and their coworkers.

Study Design:  

For Phase One (Dataset 1, Phase One Data), a company executive sent an email to all employees, asking them to complete a web-based survey with questions regarding work-family issues. A link to the survey website was embedded in the email. Respondents could request a paper survey if desired. Participation was voluntary, no compensation was given, and respondents did not identify themselves. Due to the sensitive nature of intimate partner violence (IPV) questions, respondents who reported IPV were queried at several points in the survey about their comfort level. If respondents indicated discomfort, they were given the option of ending their participation and were directed to IPV counseling services. Respondents were instructed to complete the survey at work, on company time. Most respondents completed the survey in less than 20 minutes.

For Phase Two (Dataset 2, Phase Two Data), a company executive sent an email to all employees explaining that they would receive an inquiry from researchers at the University of Arkansas requesting their participating in a study on work-family issues. Two days later, researchers sent an email to employees explaining the purpose of the study, their freedom to participate or not, their anonymity if they chose to participate, and a link to the web-based survey. Respondents could request a paper survey if desired. No compensation was given to participants. Respondents were instructed to complete the survey at work, on company time. Most respondents completed the survey in less than 20 minutes. As in the Phase One survey, respondents who reported IPV were queried at several points in the survey about their comfort level. If respondents indicated discomfort, they were given the option of ending their participation and were directed to IPV counseling services. Seventeen respondents exited the survey after the IPV questions in Phase Two.

Sample:  

The sample for Phase One (Dataset 1, Phase One Data) was composed of 1,588 women and 838 men who worked in three midsized business organizations headquartered in a southern state. The first organization, an insurance provider, employed a primarily female workforce. The second organization, a transportation company, employed a primarily male workforce. The third organization, which had a balanced workforce, was a university in which staff members were surveyed. Although all three organizations were headquartered in one state, they also had operations in 38 other states. Overall, 26 percent of the respondents in the sample were from states other than the headquarter state.

The sample for Phase Two (Dataset 2, Phase Two Data) was composed of 2,063 women and 688 men who worked in a midsized financial services institution headquartered in a southern state.

Mode of Data Collection:   paper and pencil interview (PAPI), web-based survey

Description of Variables:  

Phase One (Dataset 1, Phase One Data) includes demographic variables of marital status, respondent education, spouse education, age, gender, race, salary, and number of children. Variables ask respondents about their own current and lifetime experiences with physical, emotional and sexual abuse, if they know of coworkers who have experienced physical, emotional or sexual abuse, and effects on workplace measures of job performance, attendance, and feelings of safety at work. Other variables ask about the utilization of available resources, such as, support groups, alcohol or drug treatment, legal aid services, shelters or safe houses, paid or unpaid time off of work, and referrals to other resources.

Phase Two (Dataset 2, Phase Two Data) includes the same demographic variables as Phase One. There are more detailed variables on the type of abuse the respondent may have experienced and if the abuse ever occurred at the workplace. Other variables ask about how the respondent may have reacted to a coworker's abusive situation and its impact on the workplace.

Response Rates:  

The response rates for Phase One (Dataset 1) ranged from 29 to 36 percent.

The overall response rate for Phase Two (Dataset 2) was 58 percent.

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Created variable labels and/or value labels.
  • Standardized missing values.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

Related Publications ?

Variables

Utilities

Metadata Exports

If you're looking for collection-level metadata rather than an individual metadata record, please visit our Metadata Records page.

Download Statistics