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Evaluation of the Bureau of Justice Assistance's Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse Demonstration Programs, 2002-2006 (ICPSR 25741) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Lummi Nation’s Community Mobilization Against Drugs (CMAD) Initiative successfully achieved its four stated goals, which were to reduce illicit drug trafficking, reduce rates of substance use disorder and addiction, prevent drug abuse and underage drinking among youth, and mobilize the community in all aspects of prevention, intervention, and suppression of alcohol and drug use, drug abuse, and drug trafficking. The study also aimed to evaluate whether the outcomes of the demonstration project had application for other tribal communities confronting similar public safety issues related to substance abuse. Qualitative information from focus group interviews was collected. Six focus groups were held with individuals representing the following populations: service providers, policy makers, adult clients and family members, youth, traditional tribal healers, and community members. In addition to the focus groups, the evaluation team conducted an interview session with two traditional providers who preferred this format. All focus groups were conducted on-site at Lummi by two trained moderators from the evaluation team. There were six different sets of questions, one for each group. Each set included 9 to 10 open-ended questions, which addressed knowledge and impact of the Community Mobilized Against Drugs (CMAD) Initiative; issues or problems with the Initiative; how the community viewed its actions; the importance and inclusion of a cultural perspective (traditional healers and others) in implementing various aspects of the CMAD Initiative; and how the Initiative had affected work and networking capabilities, policy making decisions, and/or treatment. Participants were also asked to think about what they would like CMAD to address and about their perceptions and definitions of some of the service barriers they may be experiencing (clients, community, and/or youth). All of the focus groups were openly audio taped with full knowledge and agreement of the participants.

Access Notes

  • One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions; consult the restrictions note to learn more.

    Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Dataset(s)

Dataset
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Study Description

Citation

Joe, Jennie R. Evaluation of the Bureau of Justice Assistance's Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse Demonstration Programs, 2002-2006. ICPSR25741-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2009-09-18. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR25741.v1

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2005-AC-BX-0011)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   alcohol abuse, community involvement, crime control, crime prevention, drug abuse, drug education, drug related crimes, drug traffic, drug treatment, indigenous peoples, law enforcement, program evaluation, substance abuse, substance abuse treatment, treatment programs

Smallest Geographic Unit:   none

Geographic Coverage:   United States, Washington

Time Period:  

  • 2002--2006

Date of Collection:  

  • 2006-07-18--2006-07-19
  • 2006-09-18--2006-09-20

Unit of Observation:   individuals

Universe:   All members of the Lummi Nation who are part of the following groups: service providers, policy makers, adult clients and family members, youth, traditional tribal healers/practitioners, and community members.

Data Types:   survey data

Data Collection Notes:

This study also utilized data from 100 community surveys, and secondary data collected from multiple tribal departments and from units that are part of the Community Mobilized Against Drugs (CMAD) collaborative. Community surveys and secondary data are not available as part of this data collection.

The zip file pkg25741-0001_ENCL.zip contains the following 7 files: qda25741-0001_Adult_Clients_ENCL.txt, qda25741-0001_Service_Providers_ENCL.txt, qda25741-0001_Youth_ENCL.txt, qda25741-0001_Community_Members_ENCL.txt, qda25741-0001_Policy_Makers_ENCL.txt, qda25741-0001_Traditional_Healers_Smallgroup_ENCL.txt, qda25741-0001_Traditional_Healers_Focusgroup_ENCL.txt. All of these files are available in plain text, rich text, and PDF formats.

Methodology

Study Purpose:   The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Lummi Nation?s Community Mobilization Against Drugs (CMAD) Initiative successfully achieved its four stated goals, which were to reduce illicit drug trafficking, reduce rates of substance use disorder and addiction, prevent drug abuse and underage drinking among youth, and mobilize the community in all aspects of prevention, intervention, and suppression of alcohol and drug use, drug abuse, and drug trafficking. The study also aimed to evaluate whether the outcomes of the demonstration project had application for other tribal communities confronting similar public safety issues related to substance abuse.

Study Design:   Six focus groups were held with individuals representing the following populations: service providers, policy makers, adult clients and family members, youth, traditional tribal healers/practitioners, and community members. All focus groups were conducted on-site at Lummi by two members of the evaluation team, both trained moderators, who oversaw and ensured the focused flow of discussion on the defined questions. The focus groups occurred in surroundings that ensured privacy and confidentiality. All consenting processes occurred just prior to the start of the groups except for the youth group session, in which all participants were required to come with signed parental/participant consent forms. Participants were handed copies of the focus group questions to refer to throughout the process. There were six different sets of questions, one for each group. Each set included 9 to 10 questions. All questions followed the format from general to specific and reflected an open-ended approach that encouraged discussion. These questions were reviewed by each member of Evaluation Oversight Committee (EOC), individually and as part of the group. All the focus groups were openly audio taped with full knowledge and agreement of the participants. In addition to taping, the moderators took notes throughout the session. The focus groups took from 90 to 120 minutes to conduct, depending on the length and time participants took to discuss the questions. In addition to focus groups, the evaluation team conducted an interview session with two traditional providers who preferred this format. These two individuals were interviewed together using the same questions employed in the focus group for traditional healers. All participants were provided with snacks and were compensated for their time and effort. Because the service providers and policy makers were paid employees of the Lummi Nation, they received prints of paintings done by Northwest Indian artists. All other focus group participants received a $20 gift cards to WalMart at the conclusion of the session.

Sample:   Forty-seven adults and youth participated in the focus groups. Of those, 26 were female and 21 were male. The size of the 6 focus groups ranged from 5 to 11 participants. All but a couple of the participants in the focus groups were tribal members. The sample for the service providers, policy makers, youth and community groups was chosen by the Evaluation Oversight Committee (EOC) membership and the Community Mobilized Against Drugs (CMAD) Coordinator. Because of issues of confidentiality, the participant list for the youth was compiled by the coordinator and counselors of the Youth Enrichment and Social Services (Y.E.S.S.) program. These designated individuals took on the responsibility of contacting the individuals. This same method was used to compile and recruit participants to the adult client group. As for the traditional healers group, the CMAD Coordinator arranged for the evaluation team member to meet with the Lummi Cultural Commission during their meeting, since many of its members were on the list of traditional healers that was generated by the EOC.

Weight:   none

Mode of Data Collection:   face-to-face interview

Data Source:

Focus group interviews administered by the researchers.

Description of Variables:   The focus group questions were open-ended and addressed knowledge and impact of the Community Mobilized Against Drugs (CMAD) Initiative; issues or problems with the Initiative; how the community viewed its actions; the importance and inclusion of a cultural perspective (traditional healers and others) in implementing various aspects of the CMAD Initiative; and how the Initiative has affected work and networking capabilities, policy making decisions, and/or treatment. Participants were also asked to think about what they would like CMAD to address and about their perceptions and definitions of some of the service barriers they may be experiencing (clients, community, and/or youth).

Response Rates:   Not applicable.

Presence of Common Scales:   none

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

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