National Archive of Criminal Justice Data

This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Cost of Mental Health Care for Victims of Crime in the United States, 1991 (ICPSR 6581) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

The main objective of this survey was to determine the number of crime victims receiving mental health counseling, by type of crime, and the annual cost of treatment for each type of crime victim. Multiplying these two figures would yield an estimate of the annual financial cost of mental health care for crime victims. For this survey, mental health professionals were sampled from eight professional organizations and were asked questions about their clients during 1991. Respondents were instructed to count only those clients whose primary reason for being treated was because they were previously crime victims, regardless of whether the criminal victimization was the presenting issue at the time the client was first treated. Interviews were structured to first elicit information about the number of victims served for each type of crime. Respondents were then asked for details about the type and length of treatment for the crime type most frequently encountered by the respondent. Similar information was obtained for each additional crime type mentioned by the respondent, in descending order of frequency. Variables include the number of adults, youths, and children served

Access Notes

  • These data are freely available.

Dataset(s)

Data File - Download All Files (0.5 MB)

Study Description

Citation

Cohen, Mark A., and Ted R. Miller. COST OF MENTAL HEALTH CARE FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME IN THE UNITED STATES, 1991. ICPSR version. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University [producer], 1994. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1996. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06581.v1

Persistent URL:

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (90-IJ-CX-0050)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   counseling services, crime, health care costs, mental health services, treatment programs, victim services, victims

Geographic Coverage:   United States

Time Period:  

  • 1991

Date of Collection:  

  • 1992

Unit of Observation:   Individuals.

Universe:   Mental health professionals in the United States providing counseling to crime victims.

Data Types:   survey data

Data Collection Notes:

Users are encouraged to obtain a copy of the Final Report for information on sampling and respondent contact procedures.

Methodology

Study Purpose:   Mental health care usage by crime victims is one of the least known aspects of the costs associated with victimization. Although much has been written in the clinical literature on the effects of criminal victimization on the mental health of victims, little empirical analysis has been conducted to assess the magnitude of this problem. Although victims could be surveyed directly, victims are often reluctant to answer questions of this nature and are not well informed about issues such as length of treatment and the underlying cause of mental illness. Therefore, this project was targeted at mental health professionals instead of directly surveying victims. The main focus of the survey was to determine the number of crime victims receiving mental health counseling, by type of crime, and the annual cost of treatment for each type of crime victim. Multiplying these two figures would yield an estimate of the annual financial cost of mental health care for crime victims.

Study Design:   Telephone interviews were conducted by two graduate students, both of whom had psychology and counseling backgrounds. Respondents were given a brief overview of the survey and asked if their practice in 1991 included the treatment of crime victims. If the respondent did treat crime victims, the interviewee was given the option of responding immediately or setting up a convenient time for a future telephone interview. Respondents were instructed that they were only to count clients whose primary reason for being treated was because they were previously crime victims, regardless of whether the criminal victimization was the presenting issue at the time the client was first treated. Interviews lasted between 15 and 40 minutes, with most requiring at least 20 minutes. Interviews were structured to first elicit information about the number of victims served for each type of crime. Respondents were then asked details about the type and length of treatment for the crime type most frequently encountered by the respondent. Similar information was obtained for each additional crime type mentioned by the respondent in descending order of frequency. For 19 respondents, time ran out for the interview and questions were skipped that pertained to those crime victims least encountered by that respondent. In these instances, an estimate was made for the skipped information based on a combination of the response by that respondent to the other questions and responses given by other respondents in the same cohort to that particular question.

Sample:   The survey respondents consisted of a nationally representative sample of 339 mental health professionals, stratified into eight different professional organizations whose members provide clinical mental health care services: the American Psychiatric Association (APA), the American Psychological Association (APsychA), and the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). Also included were the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT), the American Mental Health Counselors Association (AMHCA), the American Association of Pastoral Counselors (AAPC), the American Family Therapy Association (AFTA), and the American Society of Group Psychotherapy and Psychodrama (ASGPP). In some cases, a random sample was drawn directly from directories of the organization. In other cases, the organization agreed to provide a random sample of members, names and telephone numbers.

Data Source:

telephone interviews and self-enumerated questionnaires

Description of Variables:   Variables include the number of clients served who were adults (aged 18 and over), youths (aged 13-17), and children (age 12 and under)

Response Rates:   Direct telephone contact was made with 189 out of the 339 potential respondents (55.7 percent). Of the 189 respondents, 20 refused to participate in the survey, and one respondent was later removed from the data because the answers were inconsistent and often unrealistic. Usable data were therefore obtained from 168 mental health professionals, resulting in 49.8 percent of the original sample and 88.9 percent of the respondents who were actually contacted.

Presence of Common Scales:   None.

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

Version History:

  • 2005-11-04 On 2005-03-14 new files were added to one or more datasets. These files included additional setup files as well as one or more of the following: SAS program, SAS transport, SPSS portable, and Stata system files. The metadata record was revised 2005-11-04 to reflect these additions.

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