<< 
Result 17 of 650
 >>

National Archive of Criminal Justice Data

This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Hair Assays for Drugs of Abuse in a Probation Population: Pilot Study in a Florida Correctional Field Setting, 1993 (ICPSR 6527) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

The major objectives of this research project were: (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of the combination of hair and urine assays in determining drug use among probationers, (2) to examine the concordance patterns of hair and urine specimens, (3) to explore the perceptions and attitudes of probation officers regarding the use of hair assays for drug testing, and (4) to assess the feasibility of implementing hair analysis in a probationary field setting. The 22 correctional officers who participated in this study were recruited from the Florida Department of Corrections Probation Field Services Divisions, and worked within Pinellas and Pasco counties. Each officer was requested to solicit from his or her caseload eight to ten probationers who would be eligible for the project because they would be undergoing at least monthly urinalysis or urine testing. Approximately 150 probationers participated in the project and were subject to hair assays for illicit drug use, along with standard urine testing. Specimens were collected and analyzed on 90 probationers over a six-month period and on 101 probationers for five consecutive months, as well as fewer numbers of samples for the other probationers. The drugs for which the hair and urine specimens were analyzed included cocaine, opiates, cannabinoids such as marijuana, PCP, and methadone. Survey questions asked of the probation officers (Part 1) covered personal information (gender, ethnicity, education level, years of experience in corrections, and satisfaction with job) and attitudes and opinions about their jobs and drug testing (estimated percentage of caseload using drugs, whether all clients should be tested, and whether knowing drug quantities is helpful). Data in Part 2 cover probationers' drug test results and self-reported drug use, personal information (gender, age, weight, ethnicity, and criminal charge), a variety of hair questions (color, texture, style, length, how often shampooed, and if dyed, tinted, bleached, relaxed, or jeried), and use of medications, along with the medication name and amount.

Access Notes

  • These data are freely available.

Dataset(s)

DS0:  Study-Level Files
DS1:  Officer Data File - Download All Files (0.4 MB)
DS2:  Probationer Data File - Download All Files (0.9 MB)
Data:

Study Description

Citation

Mieczkowski, Tom, Richard A. Newel, Gale Allison, and Shirley Coletti. HAIR ASSAYS FOR DRUGS OF ABUSE IN A PROBATION POPULATION: PILOT STUDY IN A FLORIDA CORRECTIONAL FIELD SETTING, 1993. ICPSR version. St. Petersburg, FL: University of South Florida and Operation PAR, Inc. [producers], 1993. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1997. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06527.v1

Persistent URL:

Export Citation:

  • RIS (generic format for RefWorks, EndNote, etc.)
  • EndNote XML (EndNote X4.0.1 or higher)

Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (92-IJ-CX-K010)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   attitudes, drug testing, probation officers, probationers, process evaluation, urinalysis

Geographic Coverage:   Florida, United States

Time Period:  

  • 1993-04--1993-09

Date of Collection:  

  • 1993-04--1993-09

Unit of Observation:   Individuals.

Universe:   Volunteer Florida Department of Corrections probationers of Pinellas and Pasco counties between April 1993 and September 1993.

Data Types:   survey data, and clinical data

Data Collection Notes:

The data collection instruments are provided in one Portable Document Format (PDF) file. The PDF file format was developed by Adobe Systems Incorporated and can be accessed using the Adobe Acrobat Reader. Information on how to obtain a copy of the Acrobat Reader is provided in the README file on the diskette version of this study and through the ICPSR Website on the Internet. The data collection instruments are also available in hardcopy form upon request from ICPSR.

Methodology

Study Purpose:   This project involved the recruitment and retention of approximately 150 probationers in Pinellas and Pasco counties, Florida, who were subject to hair assays and urine testing for illicit drug use over a period of time ranging from one to six months. The major objectives of this research project were: (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of the combination of hair and urine assays in determining drug use among probationers, (2) to examine the concordance patterns of hair and urine specimens, (3) to explore the perceptions and attitudes of probation officers regarding the use of hair assays for drug testing, and (4) to assess the feasibility of implementing hair analysis in a probationary field setting. The major distinction of this project is its focus on the evaluation of the difficulties and experiences associated with implementing a hair testing regimen in a correctional agency. The project did not institute a complete hair testing program. The project, however, sought to simulate major features of such an implementation. In that regard, the research project put emphasis on "normal work" integration and "real world" applicability. In this sense, the project sought to insert a simple hair specimen collection protocol in the normal working relationship between selected probation officers and their probationer caseload.

Study Design:   The 22 correctional officers who participated in this study were recruited from the Florida Department of Corrections Probation Field Services Divisions, and worked within Pinellas and Pasco counties. Each officer was requested to approach and solicit from his or her caseload eight to ten probationers who would be eligible for the project because they would be undergoing at least monthly urine testing. The participation of all parties was voluntary, and the data were not used for any decisions regarding case disposition or treatment. Each probationer was required to sign an informed consent form. Probation officers were trained to collect hair specimens and to incorporate the hair collection procedure into their normal routine with their probationers. The project intended to recruit between 150-200 volunteer probationers with the supposition that approximately 100 would persist in participation for the entire six months of the project. Specimens were collected and analyzed on 90 probationers over a six-month period and on 101 probationers for five consecutive months, as well as fewer numbers of samples for the other probationers. The drugs for which the hair and urine specimens were analyzed included cocaine, opiates, cannabinoids, PCP, and methadone. The urine samples were analyzed by EMIT using National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)-recommended cutoff values. The hair samples were taken simultaneously with the urine specimens and were analyzed by the Psychemedics Corporation of Culver City, California. The cutoff values were the lowest recommended by the testing laboratory as detectable (2 ng/10 mg for cocaine and opiates, .05 ng/10 mg for cannabinoids). Since the values for the hair assays are reported in actual concentrations, manipulation of the cutoff values is readily done.

Sample:   The 22 correctional officers who participated in this study were recruited from the Florida Department of Corrections Probation Field Services Divisions, and worked within Pinellas and Pasco counties. Each officer was requested to approach and solicit from his or her caseload eight to ten probationers who would be eligible for the project because they would be undergoing at least monthly urine testing.

Data Source:

self-enumerated forms and hair and urine specimens

Description of Variables:   Survey questions asked of the probation officers (Part 1) covered personal information (gender, ethnicity, education level, years of experience in corrections, and satisfaction with job) and attitudes and opinions about their jobs and drug testing (estimated percentage of caseload using drugs, whether all clients should be tested, and whether knowing drug quantities is helpful). Data in Part 2 cover probationers' drug test results and self-reported drug use, personal information (gender, age, weight, ethnicity, and criminal charge), a variety of hair questions (color, texture, style, length, how often shampooed, and if dyed, tinted, bleached, relaxed, or jeried), and use of medications, along with the medication name and amount.

Response Rates:   The project initially was able to recruit approximately 150 volunteer probationers. There were 91 probationers who persisted for the entire six-month collection period of the project, although complete specimens were collected for 90 cases. Because the program was voluntary, and because attrition would occur in the sample group due to a variety of reasons, an approximate loss of 50 percent was anticipated. Cases were lost over the course of the project at a low but persistent rate, and the losses were not typically related to the research project itself, but to other situations of the individual probationers. Thus the 59.2 percent survival rate of volunteer probationers was within the initial objective of retaining 50 percent for the complete life of the project.

Presence of Common Scales:   None.

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

Version History:

  • 2006-03-30 File QU6527.ALL.PDF was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads.
  • 2006-03-30 File CB6527.ALL was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads.
  • 2006-03-30 File QU6527.ALL.PDF was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads.
  • 2006-03-30 File CB6527.ALL was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads.
  • 2006-03-30 File QU6527.ALL.PDF was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads.
  • 2006-03-30 File CB6527.ALL was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads.
  • 2006-03-30 File QU6527.ALL.PDF was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads.
  • 2006-03-30 File CB6527.ALL was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads.
  • 2006-03-30 File QU6527.ALL.PDF was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads.
  • 2006-03-30 File CB6527.ALL was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads.
  • 2005-11-04 On 2005-03-14 new files were added to one or more datasets. These files included additional setup files as well as one or more of the following: SAS program, SAS transport, SPSS portable, and Stata system files. The metadata record was revised 2005-11-04 to reflect these additions.

Related Publications

Utilities

Metadata Exports

If you're looking for collection-level metadata rather than an individual metadata record, please visit our Metadata Records page.

Download Statistics

Found a problem? Use our Report Problem form to let us know.