National Archive of Criminal Justice Data

This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Prejudice and Violence in the American Workplace, 1988-1991: Survey of an Eastern Corporation (ICPSR 6135)

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

This study was conducted to examine the nature and extent of prejudice-based mistreatment of employees in the workplace. The researchers investigated the effects of mistreatment on employees' psychological well-being, interpersonal relationships, and perceptions of the work environment. Personal interviews were conducted with 327 first-line workers at an American corporation in the middle Atlantic states to determine workers' experiences of violence, discrimination, and prejudice and their responses to such victimization. Three dimensions of victimization were explored: personal victimization, prejudiced victimization, and co-victimization. Self-reported symptoms of post-traumatic stress were identified. Data were also collected to ascertain job satisfaction and job autonomy and to determine if these factors mitigate the effects of mistreatment. Demographic information includes age, race, sex, income, education, marital status, ethnicity, religion, handicap, and sexual orientation. The company involved in the research has been kept anonymous.

Access Notes

  • These data are freely available.

Dataset(s)

DS1:  Survey Response Raw Data - Download All Files (2.3 MB)
DS2:  SPSS Export File - Download All Files (0.2 MB)
Data:
DS3:  SAS Data Definition Statements - Download All Files (0.3 MB)
Data:

ASCII + SAS Setup
DS4:  User Guide
Documentation:
Download:
No downloadable data files available.

Study Description

Citation

Ehrlich, Howard J., and Barbara E.K. Larcom. Prejudice and Violence in the American Workplace, 1988-1991: Survey of an Eastern Corporation. ICPSR06135-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1993. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06135.v1

Persistent URL:

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (90-IJ-CX-0056)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   discrimination, interpersonal relations, perceptions, post-traumatic stress disorder, prejudice, psychological wellbeing, victimization, work environment, workers, workplace violence

Geographic Coverage:   United States

Time Period:  

  • 1988-10--1991-10

Date of Collection:  

  • 1991-10

Unit of Observation:   Individuals.

Universe:   Employees at the two largest work sites of a corporation in the middle Atlantic states.

Data Types:   survey data

Methodology

Study Purpose:   The site of this study was a corporation located in the middle Atlantic states. Approximately ten years prior to the study, the company had experienced difficulty implementing its affirmative action plan. Since then, the company had aggressively recruited African Americans and women of any background. This study was undertaken to examine the nature and extent of intergroup tensions, prejudice-based mistreatment, conflict, and ethnoviolence in the workplace and how these experiences affect psychological well-being, interpersonal relationships, perceptions of the work environment, and role performance of workers and managers and the various social groups to which they belong.

Study Design:   The unidentified corporation employed over 4,300 people and had 23 work sites in the local metropolitan area. The study was conducted at its two largest work sites, which are referred to by the pseudonyms Gopher and Blucher. Interviews with 327 employees at the work sites were conducted by the researchers and eight other trained interviewers. The data collection instrument included both structured and open-ended questions. Three dimensions of victimization were explored: personal victimization, prejudiced victimization, and co-victimization. Self-reported symptoms of post-traumatic stress were identified. Data were also collected to ascertain job satisfaction and job autonomy and to determine if these factors mitigate the effects of mistreatment. Respondents were limited to discussing incidents occurring in the last three years and were asked to describe their own personal experiences with mistreatment as well as instances of mistreatment involving coworkers.

Sample:   Individuals were selected for the study through cluster sampling. Workers were randomly selected from the company's two largest work sites. Personnel records were reviewed to identify each individual's coworkers. The researchers attempted to interview the selected individual and all of her/his coworkers.

Data Source:

personal interviews

Description of Variables:   Data were collected on the frequency of prejudice-based mistreatment involving eight social categories: sex, education, race, ethnicity, age, religion, sexual orientation, and handicap/illness. Additional data were collected on the occurrence of 12 types of mistreatment: name-calling or insulting comments, deprivation of privileges other workers received, denial of promotions or raises, treatment as if nonexistent, set up for failure, deprivation of necessary training, unwanted sexual attention, physical attacks or threats, destruction of personal property, threat of firing, insulting phone calls, and any other form of mistreatment. Victims of mistreatment were asked to indicate how it affected their jobs and to describe what subsequent actions they would, or did, take following an incident of mistreatment, including talking about the incident with peers, filing a formal complaint, and confronting the perpetrator. Additional data were collected regarding job satisfaction, job autonomy, and the presence of post-traumatic stress. Demographic information includes age, race, sex, income, education, marital status, ethnicity, religion, handicap, and sexual orientation.

Response Rates:   Not applicable.

Presence of Common Scales:   None

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

Version History:

  • 2005-11-04 On 2005-03-14 new files were added to one or more datasets. These files included additional setup files as well as one or more of the following: SAS program, SAS transport, SPSS portable, and Stata system files. The metadata record was revised 2005-11-04 to reflect these additions.

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