National Archive of Criminal Justice Data

This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Problem Behaviors in Maltreated Children and Youth: Influential Child, Peer, and Caregiver Characteristics, 1999-2000 [United States] (ICPSR 4258) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

This project examined the problem behaviors of maltreated children and adolescents and the predictors of changes in behavior over an 18-month period. Problem behaviors included aggression, delinquency, risky sexual practices, substance abuse, and suicidal behaviors. The project used data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW), a national probability survey of children assessed following a child maltreatment report. This collection consists of SAS code used to produce subsets of the NSCAW data and the analyses for three chapters of the project's final report. Chapter 2 examined aggression and changes in behavior over 18 months for children aged six to ten years at the time of the baseline interview. Chapter 3 examined self-reported delinquency and caregiver-reported aggressive and delinquent behavior and changes in behavior over 18 months for youth aged 11 to 15 years at the time of the baseline interview. Chapter 4 examined risky behavior changes (risky sexual behavior, substance abuse, and suicidal risk behavior) over 18 months for youth aged 11 to 15 years at the time of the baseline interview.

Access Notes

  • These data are freely available.

Dataset(s)

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Documentation:
Data:

Study Description

Citation

Wall, Ariana E. Problem Behaviors in Maltreated Children and Youth: Influential Child, Peer, and Caregiver Characteristics, 1999-2000 [United States]. ICPSR04258-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-07-06. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04258.v1

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2003-IJ-CX-1004)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   abused children, adolescents, aggression, behavior problems, caregivers, child welfare, delinquent behavior, family histories, parent child relationship, risk factors

Geographic Coverage:   United States

Time Period:  

  • 1999-09--2000-12

Date of Collection:  

  • 1999-09--2000-12

Data Types:   program source code

Data Collection Notes:

In order to use the SAS code provided in this collection, users must first obtain the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) data. The NSCAW data are available by application from the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect at Cornell University. Users are also strongly encouraged to read the documentation for the NSCAW data and the final report for this study.

Methodology

Study Purpose:   This project examined the problem behaviors of maltreated children and adolescents and the predictors of changes in behavior over an 18-month period. Problem behaviors included aggression, delinquency, risky sexual practices, substance abuse, and suicidal behaviors. The project used data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW), a national probability survey of children assessed following a child maltreatment report. Hypotheses developed for the current research were: (1) Physically abused children are more aggressive than children who experience other types of maltreatment, (2) Child characteristics such as low academic achievement, low social skills, hyperactivity-impulsivity-attention (HIA) problems, and peer rejection are associated with higher aggression at baseline and less improvement in aggressive behavior over 18 months. (3) Caregiver characteristics such as caregiver monitoring, harsh discipline, domestic violence, arrest, substance abuse, and poverty are associated with higher aggression at baseline and less improvement in aggressive behavior over 18 months (4) Higher cumulative risk is associated with higher aggression at baseline and less improvement in aggression over 18 months. (5) Males are more aggressive than females. (6) Meaningful variation exists by gender for child and caregiver characteristics associated with aggressive behavior at baseline. (7) Factors associated with change in aggression over 18 months vary by gender.

Study Design:   Data used for this project are from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW), the first national longitudinal probability study of child welfare to collect extensive data from children, caregivers, teachers, and child welfare workers. This collection consists of SAS code used to produce subsets of the NSCAW data and the analyses for three chapters of the project's final report. Chapter 2 examined aggression and changes in behavior over 18 months for children aged six to ten years at the time of the baseline interview. Chapter 3 examined self-reported delinquency and caregiver-reported aggressive and delinquent behavior and changes in behavior over 18 months for youth aged 11 to 15 years at the time of the baseline interview. Chapter 4 examined risky behavior changes (risky sexual behavior, substance abuse, and suicidal risk behavior) over 18 months for youth aged 11 to 15 years at the time of the baseline interview.

Weight:   The SAS code includes use of the sample weights from the NSCAW data.

Data Source:

National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) sponsored by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families

Description of Variables:   Measures that can be created using the SAS code to subset the NSCAW data and for the Chapter 2 analyses include age at baseline (6 to 10 years), caregiver-reported behaviors of aggression, a new report(s) of abuse or neglect involving the child since the last interview, child characteristics (academic achievement, social skills, depression, hyperactivity-impulsivity-attention (HIA) problems, and peer rejection), and caregiver characteristics (domestic violence, parental arrest, parent substance abuse, and poverty), and a child cumulative risk score. Measures that can be created using the SAS code to create the subsets and for the Chapter 3 analyses include age at baseline (11 to 15 years), caregiver-reported behaviors of aggression and delinquency, child self-report of delinquency, child characteristics (hyperactivity-impulsivity-attention problems, social skills, academic achievement, depression, aggression, substance abuse, and risky sexual behavior), peer characteristics (deviant peer associations and peer rejection), and caregiver characteristics (relatedness to caregiver, caregiver monitoring of youth, discipline, and poverty level). A rater variable created for Chapters 2 and 3 indicated if the caregiver rating behavior at baseline and 18 months was the same, different, or could not be determined. Measures that can be created using the SAS code to create the subsets and for the Chapter 4 analyses include age at baseline (11 to 15 years), risky behaviors (risky sexual behavior, substance abuse, and suicidal behavior), child characteristics (academic achievement, school engagement, social skills, depression, aggression, HIA problems, externalizing behaviors, and sexually assaultive behavior), peer characteristics (deviant peer associations and peer rejection), and caregiver characteristics (relatedness to caregiver, caregiver monitoring of youth, discipline, and poverty level), and a parent cumulative risk score. Variables from the NSCAW data used in the SAS code include the child's gender and race/ethnicity, child maltreatment type, child welfare service setting, and sample weights.

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Original ICPSR Release:  

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