National Archive of Criminal Justice Data

This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

National Evaluation of the Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grant Program, 1998-2002 (ICPSR 4046) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

This study examined the operation of the Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grant program (JAIBG) from fiscal years 1998 through 2000. In order to describe how states implemented the JAIBG program, this study examined the program's effects on state and local juvenile justice policies and practices, which included studying how states awarded the grant funds to localities and for what purposes, and an assessment of how states changed their policies and practices during this period. Variables in Part 1 (Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grant (JAIBG) Subgrant Follow-Up Information Form Data) provide grant information, jurisdiction type, planning typology of state, amount of funds budgeted for administrative purposes, and for each of 12 purpose areas, total amount of funds spent in subgrant, and number of the various entities involved in juvenile crime prevention. Variables in Part 2 (Fiscal Year 1998 Supplemental Programmatic Information Form Data) provide grant information, jurisdiction type, planning typology of state, type of program, primary purpose of funded programs in each of the 12 purpose areas (if the funds supported a new program in that purpose area), as well as allocation of funds and total funds in each purpose area. Variables in Parts 3-5 (Perceptions and Attitudes About the JAIBG Program Survey Data for JAIBG Subgrant Recipients, Perceptions and Attitudes About the JAIBG Program Survey Data for State Juvenile Crime Enforcement Coalition (JCEC) Members, and Perceptions and Attitudes About the JAIBG Program Survey Data for Local Juvenile Crime Enforcement Coalition (JCEC) Members) provide state, planning typology of state, and recipient's professional affiliations (by category). The surveys also included questions to measure the recipient's satisfaction with the JAIBG program and the funding received. Data available in this collection were obtained from the following two sources: (1) data collected by Follow-Up Information Forms (FIFs) for fiscal years 1998, 1999, and 2000 (Part 1), and (2) mail survey data collected by Abt Associates Inc., which included: programmatic and financial data for a sample of fiscal year 1998 programs (Part 2), attitudinal and opinion surveys of a sample of subgrant recipients (Part 3), state Juvenile Crime Enforcement Coalition (JCEC) members (Part 4), and a sample of local JCEC members (Part 5).

Access Notes

  • One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions ; consult the restrictions note to learn more. You can apply online for access to the data. A login is required to apply for access.

    A downloadable version of data for this study is available however, certain identifying information in the downloadable version may have been masked or edited to protect respondent privacy. Additional data not included in the downloadable version are available in a restricted version of this data collection. For more information about the differences between the downloadable data and the restricted data for this study, please refer to the codebook notes section of the PDF codebook. Users interested in obtaining restricted data must complete and sign a Restricted Data Use Agreement, describe the research project and data protection plan, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Dataset(s)

DS0:  Study-Level Files
Documentation:
DS1:  Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grant (JAIBG) Subgrant Follow-Up Information Form Data - Download All Files (19.6 MB)
DS2:  Fiscal Year 1998 Supplemental Programmatic Information Form Data - Download All Files (11.7 MB)
DS3:  Perceptions and Attitudes About the JAIBG Program Survey Data for JAIBG Subgrant Recipients
Documentation:
Download:
No downloadable data files available.
DS4:  Perceptions and Attitudes About the JAIBG Program Survey Data for State Juvenile Crime Enforcement Coalition (JCEC) Members
Documentation:
Download:
No downloadable data files available.
DS5:  Perceptions and Attitudes About the JAIBG Program Survey Data for Local Juvenile Crime Enforcement Coalition (JCEC) Members
Documentation:
Download:
No downloadable data files available.

Study Description

Citation

Parent, Dale, and Liz Barnett. National Evaluation of the Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grant Program, 1998-2002. ICPSR04046-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2006-09-22. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04046.v1

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (1999-JR-VX-0001 and 1999-JR-VX-K006)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   attitudes, funding, grants, juvenile justice, perceptions, process evaluation, satisfaction

Smallest Geographic Unit:   state

Geographic Coverage:   United States

Time Period:  

  • 1998--2000
  • 1998

Date of Collection:  

  • 2001--2002
  • 2001

Unit of Observation:   Part 1: subgrant, Part 2: organization, Parts 3-5: individual

Universe:   Part 1: State and local subgrants of the JAIBG program during fiscal years 1998 through 2000. Part 2: State and local programs funded by subgrants of the JAIBG program during fiscal year 1998. Part 3: State and local subgrant award recipients of the JAIBG program during fiscal year 1998. Part 4: State JCEC members who received JAIBG program funding during fiscal year 1998. Part 5: Local JCEC members who received JAIBG program funding during fiscal year 1998.

Data Types:   administrative records data, survey data

Data Collection Notes:

(1) This project also collected data from several sources that are not included in this data collection, including interviews with state and local administrators and planners as well as program staff during two site visits to six states, annual telephone interviews with JAIBG coordinators for all 56 jurisdictions, in-person interviews with key officials at OJJDP during the JAIBG Act's passage and implementation, close-out data for fiscal year 1998 JAIBG funds, and training and technical assistance data gathered by the Development Services Group (the JAIBG Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) contractor). (2) JAIBG Subgrant Recipient Expenditure Survey Data (Part 2) is called Supplemental Programmatic Information Form by the final report. Because so few states supplied the breakdown of funds in their reporting, the researchers were unable to report findings on the supplemental data.

Methodology

Study Purpose:   This study examined the operation of the Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grant program (JAIBG) from fiscal years 1998 through 2000. Specifically the process evaluation examined the implementation of the program throughout the country and how states and eligible jurisdictions expended the funds. The JAIBG provided block grants to state and local governments as financial incentives to increase accountability within their juvenile justice systems by implementing several juvenile justice policies and practices to ensure accountability. These policies and practices included prosecuting as adults juveniles who committed serious violent crimes, expanding the array of graduated sanctions available to juvenile courts, holding parents responsible for seeing that their children obey court orders, and establishing juvenile records systems that parallel those for adult offenders. The JAIBG defined 12 program purpose areas (PPAs) that encompassed all phases of juvenile justice to which state and local governments could award funds. The phases included law enforcement, detention, prosecution, defense, courts, probation, correctional institutions, and aftercare, as well as support services like juvenile justice information systems.

Study Design:   To conduct this process evaluation of JAIBG, the researchers relied on secondary analysis of administrative data, which was supplemented with additional information collected by surveys. The State and Tribal Assistance Division of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency (OJJDP) of the United States Department of Justice developed a follow-up information form (FIF) to collect additional JAIBG-specific information on subgrants to show states' distribution of JAIBG funds within program purpose areas, and by type of jurisdiction. Grantees submitted their initial followup information for fiscal year 1998 on paper forms by April 2001 and entered the data for fiscal year 1999 and 2000 through OJJDP's Web-based grant management system (GMS) by April 2002. A total of 5,452 grantees reported this follow-up information, which is contained in Part 1. Abt Associates Inc. administered one data collection form and three surveys by mail. After the administration of all four surveys in December 2001, the researchers employed periodic remails, reminder postcards, and followup phone calls. To learn more detail about the distribution of funds, the researchers developed a form that enabled them to look more closely at the purpose of the fiscal year 1998 award. A total of 999 JAIBG programs were sampled to receive the form by mail and to provide the supplemental programmatic information. JAIBG coordinators filled out the forms for all sampled programs in their state. In one state, the JAIBG coordinator distributed the forms to the subgrant recipients to complete. Supplemental data, found in Part 2, are available for 862 programs. A total of 800 subgrant award recipients returned the perceptions and attitudes surveys that were mailed directly to the recipients of the above sampled programs. The results are contained in Part 3. The JAIBG program stimulated collaboration among local stakeholders in juvenile accountability programs such as units of local government, police, courts, prosecutors, defenders, probation, detention, community organizations, not-for-profit service providers, schools, and human service organizations. As members of these groups formally collaborated on local Juvenile Crime Enforcement Coalitions (JCECs), they formed linkages and interactions that extended beyond JAIBG. A total of 1,139 state JCEC members received a copy of a perceptions and attitudes survey. Data are available for 521 State JCEC members in Part 4. Finally, a total of 457 local JCEC members received a copy of a perceptions and attitudes survey. Data are available from 177 local JCEC members in Part 5.

Sample:   To collect the data contained in Part 1, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) intended to gather subgrantee award information annually on the follow-up information form (FIF). However they experienced difficulties with their Web-based grant management system. The reporting rate for each year of JAIBG funding was 88.9 percent for 1998, 63.0 percent for 1999, and 74.2 percent for 2000. The sampling procedure for the supplemental instrument consisted of selecting all awards made to state subgrant award recipients in 1998, resulting in 210 awards. Based on a robustness and waiver typology developed by the researchers, 240 local subgrant 1998 award forms were randomly sampled from typologies 1, 3, and 4. All typology 2 forms were selected, resulting in 69 forms. In total, 999 programs from fiscal year 1998 were sampled to provide the supplemental information contained in Part 2. This sample was taken from only 53 of the 56 jurisdictions, as three had not submitted fiscal year 1998 FIF forms. The data in Part 3 was collected via surveys that were sent directly to the same 1998 subgrant award recipients as the above 999 sampled programs. To collect the data in Part 4, the researchers obtained Juvenile Crime Enforcement Coalitions (JCEC) membership lists from the state's JAIBG coordinator for all states and territories except Alaska. In total, 1,189 state JCEC members received a copy of the perceptions and attitudes survey. Because of the large number of local JCEC members and the difficulty in obtaining current lists, a stratified sampling procedure was used to collect the data in Part 5. States were first ordered within typology categories according to their total JAIBG allocation after which the medial allocation for each category was computed. The researcher then randomly selected two states above the median and two states below, as well as alternates. A total of 16 states were selected along with alternates. Following the selection of states, the researchers used the fiscal year 1998 FIF form as the basis for local JCEC selection. First, they removed all forms in which the jurisdiction type "state" or "state agency" was indicated. Second, duplicate grant recipients were eliminated. Third, the remaining forms were divided into "yes" or "no" categories based on whether the subgrantee represented a regional coalition in order to include variation in collaboration. Fourth, forms in these two categories were numbered and random-number generated to select one form from each category. Alternates were also selected at that time. Following this selection, the researchers used local JCEC member information provided on the FIF form, or they requested the information from the state JAIBG coordinator. Through this process, the researchers developed a sample of 457 local JCEC members.

Mode of Data Collection:   mail questionnaire

Description of Variables:   Variables in Part 1 include state, fiscal year, federal award number, state subgrant award number, jurisdiction type, planning typology of state, state subgrant award amount, amount of funds budgeted for administrative purposes and for each of 12 purpose areas, total amount of funds spent in subgrant, and number of the various entities involved in juvenile crime prevention. Variables in Part 2 include federal grant number, state subgrant award number, jurisdiction type, planning typology of state, subgrant award amount, type of program, primary purpose of funded programs in each of the 12 purpose areas, whether the funds supported a new program in that purpose area, and allocation of funds (administrative costs, benefits, construction, contract services/consulting, equipment, supplies and operating expenses, personnel, travel, other) and total funds in each purpose area. Variables in Part 3 include state, planning typology of state, and recipient's professional affiliations (by category). The survey included questions about needs for which funds could not be used, satisfaction with flexibility of the JAIBG program in allowing selection of funding priorities, whether there were specific obstacles presented in the JAIBG structure that prevented the program from meeting juvenile justice needs, and whether the recipient was satisfied with the time it took to receive the funding. Variables in Part 4 and Part 5 include state, planning typology of state, and professional affiliation (by category). The surveys included questions about satisfaction with the pass-through provision, satisfaction with program purpose areas, whether there were juvenile justice needs for which the state or locality could not use the JAIBG funds, satisfaction with flexibility of the JAIBG program in allowing selection of funding priorities, whether there were specific obstacles presented in the JAIBG structure that prevented the program from meeting juvenile justice needs, whether the planning process identified needs accurately and helped allocate funds in a way that met their juvenile justice needs, whether the JCEC got useful information about the progress of funded projects, whether the state or locality achieved its intended outcomes from the JAIBG grant, and satisfaction with the time it took OJJDP to provide funds. In addition, the state JCEC members were asked if they were satisfied with the formula that determines the amount for which each state was eligible. The local JCEC members were also asked how satisfied they were with the timeliness that JAIBG funding was awarded to local grantees.

Response Rates:   For Part 1, the reporting rate for each year of JAIBG funding was 88.9 percent for 1998, 63.0 percent for 1999, and 74.2 percent for 2000. For Part 2, of the 53 sampled jurisdictions only 39 (73.6 percent) responded, resulting in an overall response rate of 86.4 percent. For Part 3, the response rate was 80.1 percent. For Part 4 and Part 5, the researchers calculated adjusted response rates after the elimination of cases in the sample with invalid contact information and those inappropriately contacted. For Part 4, the response rate was 45.7 percent and the adjusted response rate was 50.7 percent. For Part 5, the response rate was 38.5 percent and the adjusted response rate was 47.6 percent.

Presence of Common Scales:   For Parts 1-2, no scales were used, and for Parts 3-5, several Likert-type scales were used.

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

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