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National Survey of American Life - Adolescent Supplement (NSAL-A), 2001-2004 (ICPSR 36380)

Principal Investigator(s): Jackson, James S., University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research; Caldwell, Cleopatra H., University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Research Center for Group Dynamics; Antonucci, Toni C., University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center; Oyserman, Daphna R., University of Southern California. Department of Psychology

Summary:

The National Survey of American Life Adolescent Supplement (NSAL-A), 2001-2004, was designed to estimate the lifetime-to-date and current prevalence, age-of-onset distributions, course, and comorbidity of DSM-IV disorders among African American and Caribbean adolescents in the United States; to identify risk and protective factors for the onset and persistence of these disorders; to describe patterns and correlates of service use for these disorders; and to lay the groundwork for subsequent follow-up studies that can be used to identify early expressions of adult mental disorders. In addition and similar to the NSAL adult dataset (Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES), 2001-2003 [United States] (ICPSR 20240)), the adolescent dataset contains detailed measures of health; social conditions; stressors; distress; racial identity; subjective, neighborhood conditions; activities and school; media; and social and psychological protective and risk factors. Numerous variables from the adult dataset have been merged into the adolescent dataset, as the NSAL adult and adolescent respondents reside in the same households. Some of these variables apply to the entire household (i.e. region, urbanicity, and family income), while others apply specifically to the NSAL adult respondent living in the adolescent's household (i.e. adult years of education, adult marital status, and adult nativity [foreign-born vs. US born]). The immigration measures were asked of Caribbean black adult respondents only. No comparable measures assess the immigration and generational status of the Caribbean black adolescent respondents. The adult dataset measures are merged into the adolescent dataset to assist in approximating these measures for adolescent respondents. The NSAL adolescent dataset also includes variables for other non-core and experimental disorders. These include tobacco use/nicotine dependence, premenstrual syndrome, minor depression, recurrent brief depression, hypomania, and hypomania sub-threshold. Demographic variables include age, race and ethnicity, ancestry or national origins, height, weight, marital status, income, and education level.

Series: National Comorbidity Survey (NCS) Series

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    One or more files in this collection have special restrictions ; consult the restrictions note to learn more.

    Public and restricted versions of the data are included in this collection. Due to the sensitive nature of the restricted data, users will need to complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement before they can obtain the restricted version. These forms can be accessed on the download page associated with this dataset.

Dataset(s)

DS0:  Study-Level Files
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DS1:  Public Use Data - Download All Files (47.869 MB)
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DS2:  Restricted Use Data
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Study Description

Citation

Jackson, James S., Cleopatra H. Caldwell, Toni C. Antonucci, and Daphna R. Oyserman. National Survey of American Life - Adolescent Supplement (NSAL-A), 2001-2004. ICPSR36380-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2016-07-28. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36380.v1

Persistent URL: https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36380.v1

Export Citation:

  • RIS (generic format for RefWorks, EndNote, etc.)
  • EndNote XML (EndNote X4.0.1 or higher)

Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Mental Health (U01 MH057716/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:    adolescents, African Americans, after school programs, alcohol consumption, beliefs, Black community, child care, church membership, crosscultural differences, depression (psychology), discrimination, doctor visits, drug abuse, family relationships, friendships, identity, mental disorders, mental health, psychiatric services, racial attitudes, religion, school attendance, school dropouts, self esteem, social support, suicide

Smallest Geographic Unit:    State

Geographic Coverage:    United States

Time Period:   

  • 2001--2004

Date of Collection:   

  • 2001--2004

Unit of Observation:    Individual

Universe:    Interviews were conducted with 1170 African American and Caribbean Black adolescents 13-17 years of age who were attached to the NSAL adult households. There were no adolescent White respondents. Some survey items were asked of only males or females: Adolescent males only were administered SS46-SS51 (non-residential father issues) and HE21-HE23 (male pubertal development), while adolescent females only were administered SS39-SS45 (non-residential father issues) and PR1-PR50 (women's health section).

Data Type(s):    survey data

Data Collection Notes:

At the time of data release, August 2016, these data may NOT be merged with the NSAL (ICPSR 20240: DS3) or NSAL SAQ (ICPSR 27121) data. Not all adults in the NSAL adolescent sampled household units were parents of the adolescents. This makes a large difference because of the adolescent disorders that depend upon "parental" reports. As new files and/or information are received, ICPSR will update the study accordingly.

There will be some follow-up data sets and updates to this collection in the future.

Additional information on the National Survey of American Life - Adolescent Supplement (NSAL-A) can be found by visiting The National Survey of American Life project Web site.

Methodology

Study Purpose:    The study was part of the NIMH Collaborative Epidemiology Survey (CPES) initiative that included three national representative surveys - the NSAL, the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R), and the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS).

Study Design:    The NSAL data collection was based on a multi-stage area probability sample using a stratified and clustered sample design, resulting in the creation of the variables stratum and cluster. The first stage of selection used a stratification approach of selecting 64 Primary Sample Units (PSUs) for the Core sample and an additional 8 PSUs for the Caribbean Supplement. The second stage of selection used a clustering approach of selecting area segments within each PSU. Clustering was used to reduce the cost of data collection since groups (clusters) of frame elements, rather than individual frame elements, were selected for inclusion in a study.

Sample:   

Data were collected using a stratified and clustered sample design. The NSAL sample included 66 strata, most of which contain two clusters. One Caribbean stratum, however, included eight clusters. Thus, the total number of clusters for the NSAL is 138. Greater detail on how the NSAL strata and clusters were created from the PSUs and segments can be found in the following publications including the NSAL technical report on sample design, weighting and variance estimation:

  1. Heeringa, S.G., Wagner, J., Torres, M., Duan, N., Adams, T., Berglund, P. (2004). Sample designs and sampling methods for the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Studies (CPES). International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, 13, 221-240.
  2. Jackson, J. S., Torres, M., Caldwell, C. H., Neighbors, H. W., Nesse, R. M., Taylor, R. J., Trierweiler, S. J., et al. (2004). The National Survey of American Life: A Study of Racial, Ethnic, and Cultural Influences on Mental Disorders and Mental Health. International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, 13(4), 196-207.

Time Method:    Cross-sectional ad-hoc follow-up

Weight:    Weights were created to account for unequal probabilities of selection, non-response, and post-stratification. The sum of the adolescent population weights (adolpswg) is 3,286,117, the number of adolescents across the US who live in areas where Blacks live. Similar to the adult dataset, there is a centered adolescent weight (wgtcent), which is a rescaled version of the adolescent population weight. When the centered adolescent weights are added, the sum is equal to the NSAL adolescent sample size of 1170. An adolescent weight should always be used when analyzing adolescent data, and also when conducting any analyses where any variables from the adolescent dataset are included. More information can be found in the following: Heeringa, S.G., Wagner, J., Torres, M., Duan, N., Adams, T., Berglund, P. (2004). Sample designs and sampling methods for the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Studies (CPES). International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, 13, 221-240.

Mode of Data Collection:    face-to-face interview

Description of Variables:    Similarly to the NSAL adult dataset, the adolescent dataset contains detailed measures of health; mental disorders; social conditions; stressors; distress; racial identity; subjective, neighborhood conditions; activities and school; media; and social and psychological protective and risk factors. All variables are documented in either the NSAL Adolescent Codebook, or the Derived Variables supplement to the NSAL Adolescent Codebook (ICPSR 20240).

Response Rates:    The final overall response rate for the adolescent sample was 80.6 percent, with response rates of 80.4 percent and 83.5 percent for African American and Caribbean Black adolescents, respectively.

Presence of Common Scales:    Level of impairment associated with many of the individual disorders was assessed by the Sheehan Disability Scale. This scale assesses disability in the domains of home, work, relationships, and social life, and was assessed for depression, mania, irritable major depression, panic, social phobia, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, intermittent explosive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, eating disorders, and oppositional defiant disorder.

Extent of Processing:   ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Created variable labels and/or value labels.
  • Standardized missing values.
  • Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:   2016-07-28

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