National Archive of Criminal Justice Data

This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Evaluating a Driving While Intoxicated (DWI) Night Drug Court in Las Cruces, New Mexico, 1997-1998 (ICPSR 3186)

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

The purpose of this study was twofold. First, researchers wanted to assess the benefits of the driving while intoxicated (DWI) drug court established in the Las Cruces, New Mexico, Municipal Court in an effort to determine its future viability. This was accomplished by examining the behaviors and attitudes of three groups of convicted drunk-drivers and determining the extent to which these groups were different or similar. The three groups included: (1) non-alcoholic first- and second-time offenders (non-alcoholic offenders), (2) alcoholic first- and second-time DWI offenders (alcoholic offenders), and (3) chronic three-time (or more) DWI offenders (chronic offenders). The second purpose of this study was to explore police officers' attitudes toward court-based treatment programs for DWI offenders, while examining the distinguishing characteristics between police officers who support court-based programs for drunk drivers and those who are less likely to support such sanctions. Data for Part 1, Drug Court Survey Data, were collected using a survey questionnaire distributed to non-alcoholic, alcoholic, and chronic offenders. Part 1 variables include blood alcohol level, jail time, total number of prior arrests and convictions, the level of support from the respondents' family and friends, and whether the respondent thought DWI was wrong, could cause injury, or could ruin lives. Respondents were also asked whether they acted spontaneously in general, took risks, found trouble exciting, ever assaulted anyone, ever destroyed property, ever extorted money, ever sold or used drugs, thought lying or stealing was OK, ever stole a car, attempted breaking and entering, or had been a victim of extortion. Demographic variables for Part 1 include the age, gender, race, and marital status of each respondent. Data for Part 2, Police Officer Survey Data, were collected using a survey questionnaire designed to capture what police officers knew about the DWI Drug Court, where they learned about it, and what factors accounted for their attitudes toward the program. Variables for Part 2 include police officers' responses to whether DWI court was effective, whether DWI laws were successful, the perceived effect of mandatory jail time versus treatment alone, major problems seen with DWI policies, if DWI was considered dangerous, and how the officer had learned or been briefed about the drug court. Other variables include the number of DWI arrests, and whether respondents believed that reforms weaken police power, that DWI caused more work for them, that citizens have bad attitudes, that the public has too many rights, and that stiffer penalties for DWI offenders were more successful.

Access Notes

  • These data are freely available.

Dataset(s)

DS0:  Study-Level Files
Documentation:
DS1:  Drug Court Survey Data - Download All Files (1.3 MB)
Data:
DS2:  Police Officer Survey Data - Download All Files (1.1 MB)
Data:

Study Description

Citation

Winfree, L. Thomas. EVALUATING A DRIVING WHILE INTOXICATED (DWI) NIGHT DRUG COURT IN NEW MEXICO, 1997-1998. ICPSR version. Las Cruces, NM: New Mexico State University [producer], 2001. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2001. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03186.v1

Persistent URL:

Export Citation:

  • RIS (generic format for RefWorks, EndNote, etc.)
  • EndNote XML (EndNote X4.0.1 or higher)

Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (96-IJ-CX-0022)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   alcohol abuse, arrest records, arrests, convictions (law), courts, driving under the influence, offenders, police response, program evaluation, treatment programs

Geographic Coverage:   Las Cruces, New Mexico, United States

Date of Collection:  

  • 1997--1998

Unit of Observation:   Individuals

Universe:   Part 1: All persons convicted of DWI by the Las Cruces Municipal Court between February 24, 1997, and January 26, 1998. Part 2: Police officers who had the opportunity to arrest DWI offenders during March, April, and May of 1997.

Data Types:   survey data

Data Collection Notes:

The user guide, codebook, and data collection instruments are provided by ICPSR as a Portable Document Format (PDF) file. The PDF file format was developed by Adobe Systems Incorporated and can be accessed using PDF reader software, such as the Adobe Acrobat Reader. Information on how to obtain a copy of the Acrobat Reader is provided on the ICPSR Web site.

Methodology

Study Purpose:   Recent research has shown that during the early 1990s New Mexico had one of the highest alcohol-related accident and fatality rates in the United States. In December 1995, a judge presiding in the Las Cruces, New Mexico, Municipal Court launched a driving while intoxicated (DWI) drug court pilot project. The purpose of this study was twofold. First researchers wanted to assess the benefits of the drug court in an effort to determine its future viability by examining the behaviors and attitudes of three groups of convicted drunk-drivers and determining the extent to which these groups were different or similar. The three groups included: (1) non-alcoholic first- and second-time offenders (non-alcoholic offenders), (2) alcoholic first- and second-time DWI offenders (alcoholic offenders), and (3) chronic three-time (or more) DWI offenders (chronic offenders). The second purpose of this study was to explore police officers' attitudes toward court-based treatment programs for DWI offenders, while examining the distinguishing characteristics between police officers who support court-based programs for drunk drivers and those who are less likely to support such sanctions.

Study Design:   Data for Part 1 were collected using a survey questionnaire distributed to non-alcoholic, alcoholic, and chronic offenders. At each DWI Drug Court session held in Las Cruces' Municipal Court during the time period February 24, 1997, to January 26, 1998, the presiding judge sentenced all newly convicted DWI offenders. Once sentencing was over, the judge asked all offenders (regardless of the sentence) to talk with members of the research team. There were usually three members of the research team present at each sentencing session. All convicted drunk-drivers designated by the court as either alcoholic offenders or chronic offenders were approached by researchers for participation in the study. Five non-alcoholic offenders were randomly selected during each session and approached for participation in the study. The researchers informed each offender of the general purpose of the study and of his or her right to refuse to participate in the study. Those agreeing to participate were given a questionnaire to complete, which on average took between 20 and 45 minutes to complete. Each participant who completed a questionnaire was compensated monetarily. Data for Part 2 were collected using a survey questionnaire designed to capture what police officers knew about the DWI Drug Court, where they learned about it, and what factors accounted for their attitudes toward the program. The survey instrument contained forced choice five-point Likert scale questions, visual analogs, and multiple choice and ranking questions as well as open-ended questions on police attitudes toward DWI legislation and policies. The survey also consisted of a four-question leniency index that measured officers' decisions not to arrest. The questionnaire was distributed to all police from the sheriff's department, the state police, a nearby campus police department, and a neighboring metropolitan police department who had the opportunity to arrest DWI offenders during March, April, and May of 1997.

Sample:   Random sampling was used in Part 1.

Data Source:

self-enumerated questionnaires

Description of Variables:   Part 1 variables include blood alcohol level, jail time, total number of prior arrests and convictions, the level of support from the respondents' family and friends, and whether the respondent thought DWI was wrong, could cause injury, or ruin lives. Respondents were also asked whether they acted spontaneously in general, took risks, found trouble exciting, ever assaulted anyone, ever destroyed property, ever extorted money, ever sold or used drugs, thought lying or stealing was OK, ever stole a car, attempted breaking and entering, or had been a victim of extortion. Demographic variables for Part 1 include the age, gender, race, and marital status of each respondent. Variables for Part 2 include police officers' responses to whether DWI court was effective, whether DWI laws were successful, the perceived effect of mandatory jail time versus treatment alone, major problems seen with DWI policies, if DWI was considered dangerous, and how the officer had learned or been briefed about the drug court. Other variables include the number of DWI arrests, and whether respondents believed that reforms weaken police power, that DWI causes more work for them, that citizens have bad attitudes, that the public has too many rights, and that stiffer penalties for DWI offenders were more successful.

Response Rates:   The completion rate for Part 1 was 77.9 percent. The response rate for Part 2 was 58 percent.

Presence of Common Scales:   Several Likert-type scales were used.

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Standardized missing values.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

Version History:

  • 2006-01-18 File CB3186.ALL.PDF was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads.

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