National Archive of Criminal Justice Data

This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Chicago Women's Health Risk Study, 1995-1998 (ICPSR 3002) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

The goal of the Chicago Women's Health Risk Study (CWHRS) was to develop a reliable and validated profile of risk factors directly related to lethal or life-threatening outcomes in intimate partner violence, for use in agencies and organizations working to help women in abusive relationships. Data were collected to draw comparisons between abused women in situations resulting in fatal outcomes and those without fatal outcomes, as well as a baseline comparison of abused women and non-abused women, taking into account the interaction of events, circumstances, and interventions occurring over the course of a year or two. The CWHRS used a quasi-experimental design to gather survey data on 705 women at the point of service for any kind of treatment (related to abuse or not) sought at one of four medical sites serving populations in areas with high rates of intimate partner homicide (Chicago Women's Health Center, Cook County Hospital, Erie Family Health Center, and Roseland Public Health Center). Over 2,600 women were randomly screened in these settings, following strict protocols for safety and privacy. One goal of the design was that the sample would not systematically exclude high-risk but understudied populations, such as expectant mothers, women without regular sources of health care, and abused women in situations where the abuse is unknown to helping agencies. To accomplish this, the study used sensitive contact and interview procedures, developed sensitive instruments, and worked closely with each sample site. The CWHRS attempted to interview all women who answered "yes -- within the past year" to any of the three screening questions, and about 30 percent of women who did not answer yes, provided that the women were over age 17 and had been in an intimate relationship in the past year. In total, 705 women were interviewed, 497 of whom reported that they had experienced physical violence or a violent threat at the hands of an intimate partner in the past year (the abused, or AW, group). The remaining 208 women formed the comparison group (the non-abused, or NAW, group). Data from the initial interview sections comprise Parts 1-8. For some women, the AW versus NAW interview status was not the same as their screening status. When a woman told the interviewer that she had experienced violence or a violent threat in the past year, she and the interviewer completed a daily calendar history, including details of important events and each violent incident that had occurred the previous year. The study attempted to conduct one or two follow-up interviews over the following year with the 497 women categorized as AW. The follow-up rate was 66 percent. Data from this part of the clinic/hospital sample are found in Parts 9-12. In addition to the clinic/hospital sample, the CWHRS collected data on each of the 87 intimate partner homicides occurring in Chicago over a two-year period that involved at least one woman age 18 or older. Using the same interview schedule as for the clinic/hospital sample, CWHRS interviewers conducted personal interviews with one to three "proxy respondents" per case, people who were knowledgeable and credible sources of information about the couple and their relationship, and information was compiled from official or public records, such as court records, witness statements, and newspaper accounts (Parts 13-15). In homicides in which a woman was the homicide offender, attempts were made to contact and interview her. This "lethal" sample, all such homicides that took place in 1995 or 1996, was developed from two sources, HOMICIDES IN CHICAGO, 1965-1995 (ICPSR 6399) and the Cook County Medical Examiner's Office. Part 1 includes demographic variables describing each respondent, such as age, race and ethnicity, level of education, employment status, screening status (AW or NAW), birthplace, and marital status. Variables in Part 2 include details about the woman's household, such as whether she was homeless, the number of people living in the household and details about each person, the number of her children or other children in the household, details of any of her children not living in her household, and any changes in the household structure over the past year. Variables in Part 3 deal with the woman's physical and mental health, including pregnancy, and with her social support network and material resources. Variables in Part 4 provide information on the number and type of firearms in the household, whether the woman had experienced power, control, stalking, or harassment at the hands of an intimate partner in the past year, whether she had experienced specific types of violence or violent threats at the hands of an intimate partner in the past year, and whether she had experienced symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder related to the incidents in the past month. Variables in Part 5 specify the partner or partners who were responsible for the incidents in the past year, record the type and length of the woman's relationship with each of these partners, and provide detailed information on the one partner she chose to talk about (called "Name"). Variables in Part 6 probe the woman's help-seeking and interventions in the past year. Variables in Part 7 include questions comprising the Campbell Danger Assessment (Campbell, 1993). Part 8 assembles variables pertaining to the chosen abusive partner (Name). Part 9, an event-level file, includes the type and the date of each event the woman discussed in a 12-month retrospective calendar history. Part 10, an incident-level file, includes variables describing each violent incident or threat of violence. There is a unique identifier linking each woman to her set of events or incidents. Part 11 is a person-level file in which the incidents in Part 10 have been aggregated into totals for each woman. Variables in Part 11 include, for example, the total number of incidents during the year, the number of days before the interview that the most recent incident had occurred, and the severity of the most severe incident in the past year. Part 12 is a person-level file that summarizes incident information from the follow-up interviews, including the number of abuse incidents from the initial interview to the last follow-up, the number of days between the initial interview and the last follow-up, and the maximum severity of any follow-up incident. Parts 1-12 contain a unique identifier variable that allows users to link each respondent across files. Parts 13-15 contain data from official records sources and information supplied by proxies for victims of intimate partner homicides in 1995 and 1996 in Chicago. Part 13 contains information about the homicide incidents from the "lethal sample," along with outcomes of the court cases (if any) from the Administrative Office of the Illinois Courts. Variables for Part 13 include the number of victims killed in the incident, the month and year of the incident, the gender, race, and age of both the victim and offender, who initiated the violence, the severity of any other violence immediately preceding the death, if leaving the relationship triggered the final incident, whether either partner was invading the other's home at the time of the incident, whether jealousy or infidelity was an issue in the final incident, whether there was drug or alcohol use noted by witnesses, the predominant motive of the homicide, location of the homicide, relationship of victim to offender, type of weapon used, whether the offender committed suicide after the homicide, whether any criminal charges were filed, and the type of disposition and length of sentence for that charge. Parts 14 and 15 contain data collected using the proxy interview questionnaire (or the interview of the woman offender, if applicable). The questionnaire used for Part 14 was identical to the one used in the clinic sample, except for some extra questions about the homicide incident. The data include only those 76 cases for which at least one interview was conducted. Most variables in Part 14 pertain to the victim or the offender, regardless of gender (unless otherwise labeled). For ease of analysis, Part 15 includes the same 76 cases as Part 14, but the variables are organized from the woman's point of view, regardless of whether she was the victim or offender in the homicide (for the same-sex cases, Part 15 is from the woman victim's point of view). Parts 14 and 15 can be linked by ID number. However, Part 14 includes five sets of variables that were asked only from the woman's perspective in the original questionnaire: household composition, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), social support network, personal income (as opposed to household income), and help-seeking and intervention. To avoid redundancy, these variables appear only in Part 14. Other variables in Part 14 cover information about the person(s) interviewed, the victim's and offender's age, sex, race/ethnicity, birthplace, employment status at time of death, and level of education, a scale of the victim's and offender's severity of physical abuse in the year prior to the death, the length of the relationship between victim and offender, the number of children belonging to each partner, whether either partner tried to leave and/or asked the other to stay away, the reasons why each partner tried to leave, the longest amount of time each partner stayed away, whether either or both partners returned to the relationship before the death, any known physical or emotional problems sustained by victim or offender, including the four-item Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) scale of depression, drug and alcohol use of the victim and offender, number and type of guns in the household of the victim and offender, Scales of Power and Control (Johnson, 1996) or Stalking and Harassment (Sheridan, 1992) by either intimate partner in the year prior to the death, a modified version of the Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS) (Johnson, 1996) measuring the type of physical violence experienced by either intimate partner, and the Campbell Danger Assessment for the victim and offender. In addition, Part 14 contains a number of summary variables about the fatal incident, most of which are also in Part 13. These include questions related to the circumstances of the incident, time, place, witnesses, who had initiated the violence, outcome for the offender (e.g., suicide or other death, arrest, sentence, etc.), and outcome for children and others who witnessed the violence or found the body. Part 15 contains the same data as Part 14, except that each variable is presented from the woman's point of view, regardless of whether she was the victim or offender in the homicide. Additional summary variables were added regarding the overall nature of any prior physical abuse in the relationship, as well as the overall pattern of leaving and returning to the relationship in the year prior to the death.

Access Notes

  • These data are freely available.

Dataset(s)

WARNING: Because this study has many datasets, the download all files option has been suppressed, and you will need to download one dataset at a time.

DS0:  Study-Level Files
DS1:  Questionnaire Sections B and C, Clinic/Hospital Initial Interview Data - Download All Files (16,353 KB)
DS2:  Questionnaire Section D, Clinic/Hospital Initial Interview Data - Download All Files (16,630 KB)
DS3:  Questionnaire Sections E and F, Clinic/Hospital Initial Interview Data - Download All Files (16,371 KB)
DS4:  Questionnaire Sections G Through K, Clinic/Hospital Initial Interview Data - Download All Files (16,410 KB)
DS5:  Questionnaire Section L, Clinic/Hospital Initial Interview Data - Download All Files (16,588 KB)
DS6:  Questionnaire Section M, Clinic/Hospital Initial Interview Data - Download All Files (17,547 KB)
DS7:  Questionnaire Section N, Clinic/Hospital Initial Interview Data - Download All Files (16,478 KB)
DS8:  Primary Intimate Partner Data - Download All Files (16,975 KB)
DS9:  Event Calendar Data - Download All Files (16,603 KB)
DS10:  Abuse Calendar Data - Download All Files (17,160 KB)
DS11:  Aggregate Abuse Calendar Data - Download All Files (16,416 KB)
DS12:  Summary of Abuse on Follow-Up Data - Download All Files (16,498 KB)
DS13:  Official Records for the Proxy Interview Data - Download All Files (16,323 KB)
DS14:  Proxy Interview Data - Download All Files (17,543 KB)
DS15:  Restructured Proxy Interview Data - Download All Files (16,684 KB)

Study Description

Citation

Block, Carolyn Rebecca. CHICAGO WOMEN'S HEALTH RISK STUDY, 1995-1998. ICPSR version. Chicago, IL: Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority [producer], 2000. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2000. doi:10.3886/ICPSR03002.v1

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Export Citation:

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (96-IJ-CX-0020)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   battered women, domestic violence, family violence, fatalities, intervention, relationships, risk assessment, risk factors, treatment programs, victims

Geographic Coverage:   Chicago, Illinois, United States

Time Period:  

  • 1995--1998

Unit of Observation:   Parts 1-8, 11, and 12: Individuals. Parts 9 and 10: Live events and physical abuse incidents. Parts 13 and 14: Intimate partner homicide incidents. (Part 14 includes only those incidents in which there was at least one proxy or offender interview.) Part 15: the individual woman victim or woman offender (woman victim in the two same-sex cases) in each homicide.

Universe:   Parts 1-7: Non-abused and abused women living in Chicago, IL. Parts 8-12: Abused women living in Chicago, IL. Parts 13-15: Intimate partner homicide cases in Chicago, IL, in 1995-1996.

Data Types:   survey data, aggregate data, and administrative records data

Data Collection Notes:

The user guide, codebooks, and data collection instruments are provided by ICPSR as two Portable Document Format (PDF) files. The PDF file format was developed by Adobe Systems Incorporated and can be accessed using PDF reader software, such as the Adobe Acrobat Reader. Information on how to obtain a copy of the Acrobat Reader is provided on the ICPSR Web site.

Methodology

Study Purpose:   Despite the current proliferation of intimate violence studies, domestic violence advocates and policymakers in public health and criminal justice are often confused about the efficacy of practical interventions. Under what circumstances is a woman at risk if she terminates an abusive relationship? In what situations does arrest increase or decrease the risk of death? How do stalking and other forms of harassment interact with events and changing circumstances, such as gun ownership or pregnancy, in affecting the risk of a lethal outcome for a victim or offender? The Chicago Women's Health Risk Study was conceived to respond to the increasing need for information that would be vital to medical, public health, and criminal justice agencies, and to domestic violence advocates and educators in building public health and public safety strategies. To help this array of practitioners identify and effectively intervene in potentially life-threatening intimate violence situations, the goal of the CWHRS was to develop a reliable and validated profile of risk factors directly related to lethal outcomes in intimate violence, for use in agencies and organizations working to help women in abusive relationships. Data were collected to draw comparisons between abused women in situations resulting in fatal outcomes and those without fatal outcomes, as well as baseline comparisons between abused women and non-abused women, while taking into account the interaction of numerous events, circumstances, and interventions occurring over the course of a year or two.

Study Design:   The CWHRS used a quasi-experimental design to gather survey data on 705 women at the point of service for any kind of treatment (related to abuse or not) sought at one of four medical sites serving populations in areas with high rates of intimate partner homicide (Chicago Women's Health Center, Cook County Hospital, Erie Family Health Center, and Roseland Public Health Center). Over 2,600 women patients were randomly screened for abuse using a screening questionnaire based on the Intimate Violence Screening Tool. The screener determined if a woman had a history of physical abuse by an intimate partner in the past year and whether she wanted to participate in the study. Although the format of the screening differed slightly for each site, it always included three questions: (1) "Has your intimate partner ever hit, slapped, kicked, or otherwise physically hurt or threatened you?" (2) "Has your intimate partner ever forced you to engage in sexual activities that made you uncomfortable?" and (3) "Are you afraid of your intimate partner?" A woman was categorized as "screened AW (abused woman)" if she answered positively to any of the three questions and met all of the following criteria: the abuse took place within the past year, the abuser was an intimate partner (regardless of gender), and the woman answering was at least 18 years old. Women answering "no" to all questions who were at least 18 years old and who had had an intimate relationship in the past year were categorized as "screened NAW (non-abused woman)." From the women screened, 705 valid initial interviews were conducted, in which supportive and understanding interviewers asked more sensitive questions about the violence. After the interview, 497 women were categorized as AW (they had experienced violence or a violent threat from an intimate partner in the past year), and 208 women were categorized as NAW. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews conducted during 1997-1998 with the women. To ensure anonymity and increase safety and security during the interview process, each initial interview took place in a private and secure room, behind a closed door, at the hospital, clinic, or health center. The interviews, lasting an average of 45 minutes, were conducted in both Spanish and English and touched upon details of each abusive incident (for the abused women), harassment and stalking, social support network, help-seeking and interventions, household composition, mental and physical health, pregnancy, and firearm availability. The interviewer and each abused woman worked together to complete a 12-month retrospective "calendar history," highlighting key events and each violent incident that had happened in the woman's life during the past year. The data instrument was a set of blank calendars printed with one or two months per page. First, the woman was asked to place holidays and important life events on the calendar (e.g., having a baby, changing jobs, or moving). The woman and the interviewer also placed on the calendar each violent incident at the specific day or closest approximate day of occurrence. (If a woman told an interviewer about a violent incident that was not committed by an intimate partner, the incident was recorded in the event calendar dataset.) If a woman had been abused by more than one intimate partner in the previous year, interviewers recorded each separate incident on the calendar. Each woman received ten dollars at the initial interview as a thank-you for her participation in the study. Data from the initial interview sections comprise Parts 1-8. To collect prospective data on each of the 497 women who interviewed as AW, each woman was asked, at the end of the initial interview, for her consent to be reinterviewed in a series of follow-up interviews. If a woman consented, she was asked to provide one or more contacts where she might be reached. Researchers conducted at least one follow-up interview with approximately 323 of the 497 abused women during 1998 and 1999, via personal and telephone interviews. Each respondent was given 20 dollars for each follow-up interview as a thank-you for her continued participation. The follow-up interview schedule was similar to the initial interview. In addition to the questionnaire, women who had experienced any violence at the hand of an intimate partner since the initial interview completed a follow-up calendar history, covering the period since the initial interview. At the second follow-up interview, women who had experienced any violence completed a follow-up calendar history for the period since the first follow-up interview. In homicides in which a woman was the homicide offender, attempts were made to contact and interview her. Every intimate homicide that occurred in Chicago in 1995 or 1996 involving a woman over the age of 17 was included, regardless of whether further investigation determined the homicide to be justified. This "lethal" sample, all such homicides that took place in 1995 or 1996, was developed from two sources, HOMICIDES IN CHICAGO, 1965-1995 (ICPSR 6399) and the Cook County Medical Examiner's Office. The lethal sample contained 87 homicides, including 57 women victim cases, 28 women offender cases, and two same-sex cases. Additional data for the lethal sample were collected using official records from the Chicago Police Department Murder Analysis Reports, Cook County Criminal Court records, and newspaper articles from the Chicago Tribune archive, and the Chicago Sun-Times and Chicago Defender microfiche archives (Parts 13-15). Researchers wanted to locate individuals who could serve as knowledgeable and credible proxy respondents about the relationship between the victim and the offender in the year prior to the homicide. They began with the names and addresses of relatives who had identified the body provided from the Medical Examiner files, and the names of witnesses provided by the Cook County Criminal Court records, and used three primary strategies to develop the proxy contacts. First, researchers contacted potential proxies by phone using numbers listed in the case files, current telephone books, the HAYNES CRISS-CROSS DIRECTORY at the Harold Washington Public Library, and Internet directories. Next, they mailed letters to family members introducing the study and inviting participation as potential proxies. Third, they made field visits to the homicide sites, particularly to neighbors of the couple who might provide potential proxy contact information. Researchers were able to locate and interview at least one proxy respondent for all but 11 of the 87 homicide cases. It took as many as three proxy interviews (conducted face-to-face and via telephone) to compile the information necessary to complete a case. Researchers were able to obtain permission from the Illinois Department of Corrections to interview women homicide offenders still in prison when data collection began. Each of the proxy respondents completed, as far as possible, the same questionnaire used for the 705 women sampled in the clinic/hospital settings.

Sample:   Convenience and random sampling.

Data Source:

personal interviews, telephone interviews, and official records

Description of Variables:   Parts 1-12 comprise data from the clinic/hospital sample and contain a unique identifier variable that allows users to link each respondent across files. Part 1 includes demographic variables describing each woman, such as age, race and ethnicity, level of education, employment status, screening status (AW or NAW), birthplace, and marital status. It also includes information (relationship type and length) on the woman's intimate partner, or if there was more than one, the partner the woman felt "closest to." Variables in Part 2 describe the woman's living arrangements at the initial interview and the previous year, including whether she was homeless or living in a treatment center or shelter, the number of people living in the household, the number of the woman's children living in and outside the household, whether the children were the woman's birth, adopted, or foster children, the relationship, age, and gender of up to ten children (the woman's and others) living in and outside the household, and the age, gender, and relationship of up to ten adults living in the household. Any changes to the household (e.g., someone going to jail or a baby being born) and the dates of each change are included as well. Variables in Part 3 deal with the respondent's physical and mental health, including general well-being, type and duration of any physical or emotional limiting condition, amount of bodily pain experienced, pregnancy and pregnancy outcome in the past year, alcohol or drug use and treatment, a four-item Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) scale of depression (Hays et al., 1995, Stewart et al., 1988), a scale of the strength of the woman's social support network (acceptance and support, knowledge of and access to resources, and tangible help in emergencies), and measures of other resources, such as personal and household incomes. Variables in Part 4 provide information on the number and type of guns found in the woman's home, Scales of Power and Control (Johnson, 1996) or Stalking and Harassment (Sheridan, 1992) by any intimate partner in the past year, specific types of physical violence or violent threat she might have experienced by any intimate partner in the past year (using the CTS as modified by Johnson, 1996), and the PTSD Symptom Scale (Foa, et al., 1993) measuring Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder related to these incidents. Part 5 contains variables from a lengthy section of the interview that determined which intimate partner had been responsible for the incidents just mentioned (this may not be the partner described in Part 1). If more than one partner was responsible for any of the incidents, the woman was asked to choose one partner to talk about, identified as "Name." Variables in Part 5 record the woman's partner situation (e.g., whether the partner mentioned in Part 1 was the only abuser, how many partners and how many abusers were mentioned), and basic information (type and length of relationship) about each partner mentioned in addition to the "closest" partner discussed in Part 1. Finally, Part 5 includes a series of variables about Name (the chosen abusive partner, or the "closest" partner for NAW women), including Name's age, gender, and race or ethnicity, the length of the relationship between the woman and Name, the age difference between them, Name's employment status and education, living arrangements with Name, whether the woman had left or ended the relationship, tried to leave, or asked Name to leave or end the relationship in the past year, and if so her reasons, whether she or Name had returned to the relationship after it ended, and if so her reasons, her children with Name and where they were living in the past year, and whether she had children who were stepchildren to Name. Variables in Part 6 cover the woman's help-seeking and interventions in the past year. Women interviewed as NAW (who answered "no" to each of the violence or violence threat questions) were not asked these questions. Part 6 has detailed sets of questions about informal help-seeking (talking to someone about the violence), and about three kinds of formal help-seeking (contacting an agency or counselor, seeking medical help, and contacting the police). A summary variable counts the types of help mentioned. Information on each of these four types of help-seeking includes whether the woman had tried to seek that type of help, her reasons for doing so, what type of help she received, and whether it was helpful. For this public-use version of the data the narrative responses have been deleted, but the variables with coded responses still remain. Part 6 also includes general questions on interventions, such as jail time, probation, orders of protection, and types of counseling or treatment involving Name, the seriousness of incidents with Name (whether the woman felt her life was in danger, whether Name tried to force her to do something illegal), and coded summaries of the woman's responses to open-ended questions about what she needed but did not get from formal types of help, as well as her advice to other women in a similar situation. Variables in Part 7 include questions comprising the Campbell Danger Assessment (Campbell, 1993), such as whether Name used drugs or alcohol, tried to control the woman's daily activities, beat her while she was pregnant, or had ever choked or tried to strangle her. In addition, Part 7 includes questions about Name's violence outside the home, whether Name had ever been arrested, and if so, the type of charge(s), and whether the woman had had any other intimate partner who was violent toward her. Part 8 is provided to make analysis easier for the user. It pulls together all of the information about Name (the chosen abusing intimate partner, or for women who interviewed as NAW, the closest intimate partner). In addition, Part 8 includes a number of summary variables created for analysis. Variables in Part 8 include the type and length of relationship with Name, Name's age, gender, and racial/ethnic group, age disparity between the woman and Name, Name's education and occupation, living arrangements with Name, whether the woman left, or tried to leave, or ended the relationship with Name in the past year, and if so her reasons, whether she returned to the relationship after it ended, and if so her reasons, children with Name and where they were living, and her children who were Name's stepchildren. Part 9 includes information about the events women mentioned in the 12-month retrospective "calendar history," or in their response to interview narrative questions. Part 9 is an event-level file, with a unique identifier linking each woman to her set of events. Part 9 variables include a coded description of the event, the date of the event, and for events in which the date spanned a period of time, the beginning and ending dates. Violent incidents not committed by an intimate partner are included as events in Part 9. Part 10 contains information about each violent incident or threat of violence that the woman mentioned in the 12-month retrospective calendar history. Part 10 is an incident-level file, with a unique identifier linking each woman to her set of incidents. Variables in Part 10 include two aggregate summaries of the number and maximum severity of the incidents over the past year (see Part 11), as well as information on each incident. Variables include the severity code, date, whether a weapon was involved, whether there were other people present, and if so, who, if anyone else was injured, whether the woman suffered a miscarriage as a result of the incident, whether the woman was restrained or tied down in the incident, whether Name tried to choke or strangle her, whether the woman or Name were using drugs or alcohol at the time of the incident, and the number of days between the incident and the interview. Part 11 consists of aggregate person-level variables created from the incidents in Part 10. Variables for Part 11 record the total number of incidents during the year, the number of days before the initial interview that the most recent incident occurred, the maximum severity of any incident in the past year, the total number of incidents coded under each category of severity, the number of incidents involving a weapon, a gun, or a knife, the number of incidents resulting in miscarriage, the number of incidents in which the woman was restrained or tied down, the number of incidents in which other people, including children, were present, the number of incidents in which the woman had used alcohol or drugs, the number of incidents in which Name had used alcohol or drugs, and the number of incidents in which both had used alcohol or drugs. Part 12 is a person-level file containing variables summarizing violent incidents at the hands of any intimate partner (Name or any other intimate partner) the woman experienced on follow-up. Variables in Part 12 include the dates of each follow-up interview, the number of days from the initial interview to each follow-up and the total number of follow-up days, whether there had been any violent incidents since the last interview, the total number of violent incidents during the follow-up period, the maximum severity of the incidents at each follow-up and overall, and the status of the follow-up (including whether the woman consented or had died). Parts 13-15 contain data from official records sources and information supplied by proxies for victims of intimate partner homicides in 1995 and 1996 in Chicago. Part 13 contains information about the homicide incidents from the "lethal sample," along with outcomes of the court cases (if any) from the Administrative Office of the Illinois Courts. Variables for Part 13 include the number of victims killed in the incident, the month and year of the incident, the gender, race, and age of both the victim and offender, who initiated the violence, the severity of any other violence immediately preceding the death, whether leaving the relationship triggered the final incident, whether either partner was invading the other's home at the time of the incident, whether jealousy or infidelity was an issue in the final incident, whether there was drug or alcohol use noted by witnesses, the predominant motive of the homicide, location of the homicide, relationship of victim to offender, type of weapon used, whether the offender committed suicide after the homicide, whether any criminal charges were filed, and the type of disposition and length of sentence for that charge. Parts 14 and 15 contain data collected using the proxy interview questionnaire (or the interview of the woman offender, if applicable). The questionnaire used for Part 14 was identical to the one used in the clinic sample, except for some extra questions about the homicide incident. The data include only those 76 cases for which at least one interview was conducted. Most variables in Part 14 pertain to the victim or the offender, regardless of gender (unless otherwise labeled). For ease of analysis, Part 15 includes the same 76 cases as Part 14, but the variables are organized from the woman's point of view, regardless of whether she was the victim or offender in the homicide (for the same-sex cases, Part 15 is from the woman victim's point of view). Parts 14 and 15 can be linked by ID number. However, Part 14 includes five sets of variables that were asked only from the woman's perspective in the original questionnaire: household composition, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), social support network, personal income (as opposed to household income), and help-seeking and intervention. To avoid redundancy, these variables appear only in Part 14. Other variables in Part 14 cover information about the person(s) interviewed, the victim's and offender's age, sex, race/ethnicity, birthplace, employment status at time of death, and level of education, a scale of the victim's and offender's severity of physical abuse in the year prior to the death, the length of the relationship between victim and offender, the number of children belonging to each partner, whether either partner tried to leave and/or asked the other to stay away, the reasons why each partner tried to leave, the longest amount of time each partner stayed away, whether either or both partners returned to the relationship before the death, any known physical or emotional problems sustained by the victim or offender, including the MOS scale of depression, drug and alcohol use of the victim and offender, number and type of guns in the household of the victim and offender, Scales of Power and Control (Johnson, 1996) or Stalking and Harassment (Sheridan, 1992) by either intimate partner in the year prior to the death, a modified version of the Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS) (Johnson, 1996) measuring the type of physical violence experienced by either intimate partner, and the Campbell Danger Assessment for the victim and offender. In addition, Part 14 contains a number of summary variables about the fatal incident, most of which are also in Part 13. These include questions related to the circumstances of the incident, time, place, witnesses, who had initiated the violence, outcome for the offender (e.g., suicide or other death, arrest, sentence, etc.), and outcome for children and others who witnessed the violence or found the body. Part 15 contains the same data as Part 14, except that each variable is presented from the woman's point of view, regardless of whether she was the victim or offender in the homicide. Additional summary variables were added regarding the overall nature of any prior physical abuse in the relationship, as well as the overall pattern of leaving and returning to the relationship in the year prior to the death.

Response Rates:   The response rate for Part 12 (Summary of Abuse on Follow-up Data) was 65 percent. Response rates for Parts 1-11 and Parts 13-15 are not applicable.

Presence of Common Scales:   Several Likert-type scales were used as well as the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) scale of depression (Hays et al., 1995, Stewart et al., 1988), Scales of Power and Control (Johnson, 1996) and Stalking and Harassment (Sheridan, 1992), a modified version of the Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS) (Johnson, 1996), the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptom Scale (Foa et al., 1993), and the Campbell Danger Assessment (Campbell, 1993).

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Standardized missing values.
  • Created online analysis version with question text.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

Version History:

  • 2006-03-30 File QU3002.ALL.PDF was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads.
  • 2006-03-30 File CB3002.ALL.PDF was removed from any previous datasets and flagged as a study-level file, so that it will accompany all downloads.
  • 2005-11-04 On 2005-03-14 new files were added to one or more datasets. These files included additional setup files as well as one or more of the following: SAS program, SAS transport, SPSS portable, and Stata system files. The metadata record was revised 2005-11-04 to reflect these additions.

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