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Transatlantic Trends Survey, 2007 (ICPSR 28187) RSS

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Summary:

The aim of the Transatlantic Trends Survey is to identify the attitudes of the public in the United States and in several European countries toward foreign policy issues and transatlantic issues. A project of the German Marshall Fund of the United States and the Compagnia di San Paolo (Italy), this survey has been conducted annually since 2003. The 2007 survey queried respondents on topics such as United States and European Union (EU) relations, leadership, security, and military operations, EU accession of Turkey, issues of concern with China, Iran, and Russia, attitudes toward certain countries, institutions, and people, economic versus military power, and the promotion of democracy in other countries. Several questions solicited views on politics and voting habits, including assessments of the current president of the United States and the upcoming presidential election, political party attachment and left-right political self-placement, voting intentions, whether respondents discussed political matters with friends, and whether they attempted to persuade others to share their views on politics. Demographic and other background information includes age, gender, race, religious affiliation, education, occupation, type of locality, region of residence, and prior travel to the United States or Europe.

Series: Transatlantic Trends Survey Series

Access Notes

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Dataset(s)

Transatlantic Trends Survey, 2007 - Download All Files (22.3 MB)

Study Description

Citation

Kennedy, Craig, John Glenn, Natalie La Balme, Pierangelo Isernia, Philip Everts, and Richard Eichenberg. Transatlantic Trends Survey, 2007. ICPSR28187-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2013-04-26. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR28187.v1

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • German Marshall Fund of the United States
  • Compagnia di San Paolo (Italy)
  • Fundacao Luso-Americana (Portugal)
  • Fundacion BBVA (Spain)
  • Tipping Point Foundation (Bulgaria)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   Bush, George W., democracy, disease, economic crises, energy supplies, European unification, European Union, global warming, government performance, humanitarian aid, immigration, international relations, Islam, leadership, Middle East, military alliances, military intervention, nations, NATO, nuclear weapons, political affiliation, political attitudes, political issues, presidential elections, public opinion, refugees, religious fundamentalism, social attitudes, terrorism, threats, voter attitudes, voting behavior

Smallest Geographic Unit:   country

Geographic Coverage:   Bulgaria, France, Germany, Global, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States

Time Period:  

  • 2007-06-04--2007-06-23

Date of Collection:  

  • 2007-06-04--2007-06-23

Unit of Observation:   individual

Universe:   The adult population (aged 18 years and over) in 13 countries: Bulgaria, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Data Types:   survey data

Data Collection Notes:

The original data collection was carried out by TNS, Fait et Opinion - Brussels on request of the German Marshall Fund of the United States.

For data collection, the computer-assisted face-to-face interview was used in Poland, the paper and pencil interview was used in Bulgaria, Romania, Slovakia and Turkey, and the computer-assisted telephone interview was used in all other countries.

Additional information on the Transatlantic Trends Survey is provided on The German Marshall Fund of the United States Web site and the Transatlantic Trends Web site.

Methodology

Sample:   (1) Multistage random sampling was implemented in the countries using face-to-face interviewing. Sampling points were selected according to region, and then random routes were conducted within these sampling points. Four callbacks were used for each address. The birthday rule was used to randomly select respondents within a household. (2) Random-digit dialing was implemented in the countries using telephone interviewing. Eight callbacks were used for each telephone number. The birthday rule was used to randomly select respondents within a household.

Weight:   Please refer to the "Technical Note" in the Original P.I. Documentation section of the ICPSR Codebook for information regarding the weighting system.

Mode of Data Collection:   computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI), computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI), paper and pencil interview (PAPI)

Response Rates:   Please refer to the "Technical Note" in the Original P.I. Documentation section of the ICPSR Codebook for information regarding response rates.

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Standardized missing values.
  • Created online analysis version with question text.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

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