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This study was originally processed, archived, and disseminated by Data Sharing and Demographic Research, a project funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

Familial Responses to Financial Instability, How the Family Responds to Economic Pressure: A Comparative Study, 2009 [United States] (ICPSR 26541) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

This study focused on how families respond to financial instability and economic pressure. A survey of over 1,000 adults aged 18 years and older who have a child younger than 18 years at home was conducted by Knowledge Networks on behalf of the National Center for Family and Marriage Research. The survey was completed by 1,169 respondents out of 1,855 cases (63 percent response rate). In addition to the main survey, respondents were also administered a one-question survey about insurance. Along with the survey variables from the main and the one-question surveys, Knowledge Networks' standard profile, and a series of data processing variables created by Knowledge Networks are included in the data file for the eligible cases (n = 1,169).

Series: National Center for Family and Marriage Research (NCFMR) Pilot Data Series

Access Notes

  • These data are freely available.

Dataset(s)

Familial Response to Financial Instability, How the Family Responds to Economic Pressure: A Comparative Study [United States] - Download All Files (3.3 MB)

Study Description

Citation

National Center for Family and Marriage Research, Frank F. Furstenberg, Anne H. Gauthier, and Shelley Pacholok. Familial Responses to Financial Instability, How the Family Responds to Economic Pressure: A Comparative Study, 2009 [United States]. ICPSR26541-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2010-05-20. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR26541.v1

Persistent URL:

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Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   family size, family structure, household budgets, household expenditures, household income, marital status, occupational categories, occupational status, personal finances

Geographic Coverage:   United States

Time Period:  

  • 2009

Date of Collection:  

  • 2009-08-07--2009-09-22

Unit of Observation:   individual

Data Types:   survey data

Data Collection Notes:

This research is supported by the National Center for Family and Marriage Research, which is funded by a cooperative agreement, grant number 5 U01 AE000001-03, between the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) in the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Bowling Green State University.

Methodology

Study Design:   Study design is described in the study documentation.

Sample:   The sampling description is provided in the study documentation.

Weight:   Weighting is described in the study documentation.

Mode of Data Collection:   web-based survey

Response Rates:   85.8 percent

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Performed consistency checks.
  • Created variable labels and/or value labels.
  • Standardized missing values.
  • Created online analysis version with question text.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

Version History:

  • 2010-05-20 PI requested a minor revision to the study title.

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