National Archive of Criminal Justice Data

This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Participatory Evaluation of the Sisseton Wahepton Oyate Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse Program Demonstration Project in the United States, 2006-2007 (ICPSR 22640) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

A participatory evaluation model was used to evaluate the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate (SWO) Indian Alcohol Substance Abuse Program (IASAP) project. The Community Survey (Part 1, Community Survey Quantitative Data) was used to obtain tribal members' perceptions related to the welfare of the community and their perceived levels of satisfaction with how their challenges and problems were being addressed. Data were collected between August 2006 and April 2007 using a convenience sample (n=100). Focus groups (Part 2, Focus Group Interview Qualitative Data) were held with key stake holders from five groups: past adult clients (n=6), parents of juvenile probationers (n=4), service providers and key project staff (n=4), elders (n=5), and policy-makers (n=2). The focus groups were held during three site visits between October 2006 and April 2007. Part 1 (Community Survey Quantitative Data) includes demographic variables such as gender, age, tribal enrollment status, number of years in the community, and experiences with criminal justice systems (both on and off the reservation). Other questions asked the respondent about major problems within the community (i.e., alcohol and drug use, violent crime, child and elder abuse or neglect, gang activity, and property crime) and what was being done to address the problem. Part 2 (Focus Group Interview Qualitative Data) variables were developed based on the type of focus group. Questions for past drug court participants and parents of the juvenile probationers focused on their experiences with the Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse Program (IASAP). Questions for policy-makers, service providers, and program staff focused on the impact and sustainability of the IASAP. Questions for elders focused on issues related to culture, traditional practices, and the barriers to providing cultural and/or traditional services.

Access Notes

  • One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions; consult the restrictions note to learn more.

    Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Dataset(s)

DS0:  Study-Level Files
DS1:  Community Survey Quantitative Data
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No downloadable data files available.
DS2:  Focus Group Interview Qualitative Data
Documentation:
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No downloadable data files available.

Study Description

Citation

Joe, Jennie R., Jenny Chong, Robert Young, and Darlene Lopez. Participatory Evaluation of the Sisseton Wahepton Oyate Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse Program Demonstration Project in the United States, 2006-2007. ICPSR22640-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2011-06-07. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22640.v1

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2005-AC-BX-0011)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   alcohol, alcohol abuse, driving under the influence, drug related crimes, Native Americans, public safety, substance abuse treatment, tribal courts

Smallest Geographic Unit:   none

Geographic Coverage:   Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, United States

Time Period:  

  • 2006-08--2007-04
  • 2006-10--2007-04

Date of Collection:  

  • 2006-08--2007-04
  • 2006-10--2007-04

Unit of Observation:   individual

Universe:   The universe for Part 1 (Community Survey Quantitative Data) includes all adult Native Americans who were not related to the interviewers who were in Agency Village between August 2006 and April 2007. The universe for Part 2 (Focus Group Interview Qualitative Data) is not available.

Data Types:   survey data

Methodology

Study Purpose:  

The purpose of the evaluation was to determine whether the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate (SWO) demonstration project funded by the Indian Alcohol Substance Abuse Program (IASAP) was completely implemented, whether the interventions implemented were effective, and whether the project has applications for other tribal communities confronting problems of alcohol and substance abuse.

The evaluation focused on the following six goals:

  1. To develop a project advisory team;
  2. To identify, apprehend, and prosecute those who illegally transport, distribute, and use alcohol and controlled substances;
  3. To prevent and reduce the number of alcohol and substance abuse-related crimes, traffic fatalities, and injuries;
  4. To develop and enhance collaboration with federal, state, tribal, and local criminal justice agencies;
  5. To integrate tribal and non-tribal services for offenders and their families; and
  6. To make available culturally appropriate treatment and other services.

Study Design:   A participatory evaluation model was used to evaluate the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate (SWO) Indian Alcohol Substance Abuse Program (IASAP) project. The Community Survey (Part 1, Community Survey Quantitative Data) was used to obtain tribal members' perceptions related to the welfare of the community and their perceived levels of satisfaction with how their challenges and problems were being addressed. Data were collected between August 2006 and April 2007 using a convenience sample (n=100). Three individuals from the SWO Community College were hired as survey interviewers. Each was required to obtain human subjects training and to be certified prior to conducting any recruiting or interviews. The interviewers used an IRB-approved form that explained the purpose of the interview, the respondents' rights as human subjects, compensation (a gift card) for their time, and the confidential nature of the survey. Interviewers were instructed not to begin the interview until all questions the participants may have were answered. All interviews were conducted in English and took an average of 30 to 40 minutes to complete. Focus groups (Part 2, Focus Group Interview Qualitative Data) were held with key stake holders from five groups: service providers and key project staff (n=4), parents of juvenile probationers (n=4), past adult clients (n=6), policymakers (n=2), and elders (n=5). The focus groups were held during three site visits between October 2006 and April 2007. All participants went through the required informed consent procedures prior to starting the focus groups. Focus group proceedings were audio taped and transcribed.

Sample:  

For Part 1 (Community Survey Quantitative Data) a convenience sample of 100 individuals was used. Interviewers were trained to recruit individuals in a random pattern and informed that only adult Native Americans who were not related to the interviewers were eligible. Public places, mainly in Agency Village (the district where tribal services are mainly located), were selected for participant recruitment because many Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate (SWO) members make frequent trips to Agency Village for services or for business.

Part 2 (Focus Group Interview Qualitative Data) participants were chosen based on the following criteria:

Service Providers and Key Project Staff

  1. Are employed or volunteer in a program providing service referred by the court or law enforcement;
  2. Have worked in this or another service agency on the Sisseton Reservation;
  3. Have been employed as a service provider for more than two years;
  4. Have a good understanding of existing resources for helping youth with substance abuse problems;
  5. Could be native or non-native;
  6. Have agreed and given consent to participate in the focus group;

Parents of Juvenile Probationers

  1. Have had a child or youth on probation for substance abuse violation;
  2. Have had a child or youth in a substance abuse treatment program;
  3. Are recruited and referred by the youth counselors;
  4. A member of the Sisseton community;
  5. Have agreed and given consent to participate in the focus group;

Past Adult Clients

  1. Have completed or participated in the drug court within the last two years;
  2. Is over 18 years of age;
  3. Is a member of the SWO tribe;
  4. Has been a resident in the SWO community for the last two years;
  5. Has given consent to participate in the focus group;

Policy Makers

  1. Members of the judicial committee who make recommendation on court or law enforcement;
  2. Held the policy making position for more than two years;
  3. Worked with the Sisseton community for at least two years;
  4. Has a good understanding of the working of the court and law enforcement for the community;
  5. Could be native or non-native;
  6. Have agreed and given consent to participate in the focus group;

Elders

  1. Identified and considered tribal elders (most over age 55) by study partners;
  2. Considered to be very knowledgeable about tribal culture and traditions;
  3. May be a member of the local traditional healers who work with clients with abuse problems;
  4. Longtime members of the community;
  5. Have agreed and given consent to participate in the focus group or asked for an individual interview.

Weight:   none

Mode of Data Collection:   face-to-face interview

Description of Variables:   Part 1 (Community Survey Quantitative Data) includes demographic variables such as gender, age, tribal enrollment status, number of years in the community, employment status, years of education, if the respondent has children, and the respondent's experiences with criminal justice system (both on and off the reservation). Other variables ask the respondent about major problems within the community (i.e., alcohol and drug use, violent crime, child and elder abuse or neglect, gang activity, and property crime) and what was being done to address the problem. Additional variables asked about community perceptions of safety, police responsiveness, youth activities, and job opportunities at the present time as compared to the two previous years. Part 2 (Focus Group Interview Qualitative Data) variables were based on the type of focused group. Questions for past drug court participants and parents of the juvenile probationers focused on their experiences with the Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse Program (IASAP). Questions for policy-makers, service providers, and program staff focused on the impact and sustainability of the IASAP. Questions for elders focused on issues related to culture, traditional practices, and the barriers to providing cultural and/or traditional services.

Presence of Common Scales:   Part 1 (Community Survey Quantitative Data): Several Likert-type scales were used. Part 2 (Focus Group Interview Qualitative Data): None.

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Standardized missing values.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

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