National Archive of Criminal Justice Data

This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Exploring Factors Influencing Family Members Connections to Incarcerated Individuals in New Jersey, 2005-2006 (ICPSR 22460) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

In order to develop a better understanding of the factors that influence whether a male prisoner's family stays involved in his life during incarceration, researchers conducted face-to-face interviews with inmates from two New Jersey prisons and their family members between May 2005 and July 2006. A total of 35 (25 from one prison and 10 from the other) inmates and 15 family members were interviewed, comprising 13 inmate and family dyads, 1 inmate and family triad, and an additional 21 inmate interviews. The data include variables that explore the family's relationship with the incarcerated individual in the following areas: the inmate's relationship with the family prior to the incarceration, the strain (emotional, economic, stigma) that the incarceration has placed on the family, the economic resources available to the family to maintain the inmate, the family's social support system, and the inmate's efforts to improve or rehabilitate himself while incarcerated.

Access Notes

  • One or more files in this study are not available for download due to special restrictions ; consult the restrictions note to learn more. You can apply online for access to the data. A login is required to apply for access.

    Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Dataset(s)

DS0:  Study-Level Files
DS1:  Prisoner Quantitative Data
Documentation:
Download:
No downloadable data files available.
DS2:  Family Quantitative Data
Documentation:
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No downloadable data files available.
DS3:  Prisoner Qualitative Data
Documentation:
Download:
No downloadable data files available.
DS4:  Family Qualitative Data
Documentation:
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No downloadable data files available.

Study Description

Citation

Christian, Johnna. Exploring Factors Influencing Family Members Connections to Incarcerated Individuals in New Jersey, 2005-2006. ICPSR22460-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-12-23. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22460.v1

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2004-IJ-CX-0043)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   crime impact, family life, family relations, imprisonment, inmate attitudes, inmates, life events, male inmates

Smallest Geographic Unit:   none

Geographic Coverage:   New Jersey, United States

Time Period:  

  • 2005-05--2006-07

Date of Collection:  

  • 2005-05--2006-07

Unit of Observation:   individual

Universe:   All male inmates incarcerated in a New Jersey prison between May 2005 and July 2006 and their family members.

Data Types:   survey data

Methodology

Study Purpose:   The purpose of this study was to develop a better understanding of the factors that influence whether a male prisoner's family stays involved in his life during incarceration. The study examined five domains to explore the family's relationship with the prisoner: (a) the prisoner's relationship with the family prior to the incarceration, (b) the strain (emotional, economic, stigma) that the incarceration has placed on the family, (c) the economic resources available to the family to maintain the prisoner, (d) the family's social support system, and (e) the prisoner's efforts to improve or rehabilitate himself while incarcerated.

Study Design:   Researchers conducted interviews with inmates from two New Jersey prisons and their family members between May 2005 and July 2006. Inmate participants met with researchers individually in private rooms within the prison where the study was explained and they were given an opportunity to consent to participate. Inmate interviews lasted an average of an hour, with a book of stamps provided as compensation. There were two interviewers at each session, one asking closed and open-ended questions and the other typing responses to open-ended questions. Upon completion of the interview, inmates were asked to provide contact information for the family member(s) identified as focal family. While inmates were willing, and in most instances able to provide at least an address and/or phone number for their families, making contact with family members proved difficult. In some instances, a phone number had been disconnected or an inmate was able to provide an address, but no phone number. In these cases, a general letter asking the family to contact the principal investigator was sent, but specific information about the nature of the study could not be included because of confidentiality requirements. Even when telephone contact was made, the specific topic of the study could not be revealed to anyone in the household except the individual for whom the information was provided.

Sample:   Sampling for the project began with a review of the inmate rosters from two New Jersey prisons. A random sample of 100 inmates was chosen from each institution by selecting the nth inmate from an alphabetical roster. The prison's visiting cards were reviewed for each of the inmates randomly selected to determine whether a visit had been received in the six-month period before May 31, 2005. Inmates in special units of the prison, such as the gang unit, administrative segregation, and the psychiatric stabilization unit, were excluded because conducting interviews with these inmates was considered a security risk, and their access to outside visits was modified or restricted. A dual sampling strategy for identifying potential family members was ultimately used. In addition to obtaining contact information for family members from the interviewed inmates, the principal investigator spent time at one of the prisons on Saturday mornings outside of the prison and in the area where families waited for visits. After approaching family members and explaining the purpose of the study, contact information for the families was collected with the name of the inmate they were visiting. The university Institutional Review Board required that inmates be interviewed and give permission for their family member to consider participation.

Weight:   none

Mode of Data Collection:   face-to-face interview

Description of Variables:   The data in Part 1 (Prisoner Quantitative Data) and Part 2 (Family Quantitative Data) include demographic variables such as age, race, marital status, length of relationship, number of children, length of prison sentence, and time served. Several variables focus on the contact between the inmate and family members before and during their incarceration, including if the inmate and family had lived together, frequency of contact (visits, phone calls, and mail) prior to and during incarceration, and frequency of visits from children. Other variables ask about the inmate's contributions to the family prior to incarceration (income, emotional support, help with children) and hardships the family might be experiencing due to the incarceration (loss of income, had to move, problem with childrens' behavior). The data in Part 1 also include variables about programs the inmate might have completed while incarcerated, prospects for parole, and any help the inmate received from family members while incarcerated. Part 2 also includes variables on any social support the family may have received and if the family member was aware of the inmate's criminal activity prior to incarceration. Part 3 (Prisoner Qualitative Data) and Part 4 (Family Qualitative Data) contain open-ended questions pertaining to the same subjects found in Parts 1 and 2.

Response Rates:   A total of 35 (25 from one prison and 10 from the other) inmates and 15 family members were interviewed, comprising 13 inmate and family dyads, 1 inmate and family triad, and an additional 21 inmate interviews. Of the 50 interviews completed, 24 of the inmate respondents and five of the family respondents came from the initial random sample, and the rest through face-to-face contacts with the principal investigator. Two inmates refused to participate in the study, and three family members who were reached declined to participate.

Presence of Common Scales:   Parts 1 and 2: Several Likert-type scales were used. Parts 3 and 4: None.

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Standardized missing values.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

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