National Archive of Criminal Justice Data

This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Testing a New Mediational Model of the Link Between Maltreatment and Aggression in Adolescence in Upstate New York, 2002-2004 (ICPSR 20425) RSS

Principal Investigator(s):

Summary:

This study sought to examine whether adolescents who experience rejection by both peers and parents would demonstrate higher levels of aggression due to negative views of the self and/or others. In Part 1 (Older Adolescent Data), participants were 125 male and female undergraduate students ranging in age from 18 to 27 years, who were recruited from psychology and human development classes in upstate New York between 2002 and 2003 and received course credit for participating in a study of relationships and problem solving. In small group testing sessions, participants completed assessments of several personality factors, justification of aggression, self-esteem, other-esteem, and aggression. Participants also completed the hypothetical situations task in which they assessed the provocateur's intent and their own likely response in each. For Part 2 (Adolescent Data), participants included 184 adolescents who were between the ages of 14 and 17 and enrolled at a suburban high school in upstate New York in 2003 and 2004. Adolescents were recruited to participate in a study of relationships and problem solving through announcements made by the researcher in the students' homeroom. A total of nine homerooms participated across two academic years. Each participating student's homeroom teacher completed an assessment regarding the student's behavior. As in Part 1, the students completed several self-assessments and a hypothetical situations tasks. Both Parts 1 and 2 include the demographic variables age, race, and gender and scores from the personality factors, justification of aggression, self-esteem, other-esteem, and aggression assessments and the hypothetical situations task. Part 2 also includes variables from the homeroom teacher's assessment of the student's behavior.

Access Notes

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Dataset(s)

DS0:  Study-Level Files
Documentation:
DS1:  Older Adolescent Data
Download:
No downloadable data files available.
DS2:  Adolescent Data
Download:
No downloadable data files available.

Study Description

Citation

Bradshaw, Catherine P. Testing a New Mediational Model of the Link Between Maltreatment and Aggression in Adolescence in Upstate New York, 2002-2004. ICPSR20425-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2009-03-31. doi:10.3886/ICPSR20425.v1

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Funding

This study was funded by:

  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2003-IJ-CX-1016)

Scope of Study

Subject Terms:   adolescents, aggression, interpersonal conflict, interpersonal relations, self esteem, young adults

Smallest Geographic Unit:   none

Geographic Coverage:   New York, United States

Time Period:  

  • 2002--2003
  • 2003--2004

Date of Collection:  

  • 2002--2003
  • 2003--2004

Unit of Observation:   individual

Universe:   For Part 1, the universe was all undergraduate students enrolled in a psychology class in upstate New York between 2002 and 2003. For Part 2, the universe included all students enrolled at an upstate New York high school between 2003 and 2004.

Data Types:   survey data

Methodology

Study Purpose:   The purpose of this study was to examine whether adolescents who experience rejection by both peers and parents would demonstrate higher levels of aggression due to negative views of the self and/or others.

Study Design:   In Part 1 (Older Adolescent Data), participants included 125 male and female undergraduate students ranging in age from 18 to 27 years, who were recruited from psychology and human development classes in upstate New York and received course credit for participating in a study of relationships and problem solving. In small group testing sessions, participants completed assessments of several personality factors, justification of aggression, self-esteem, other-esteem, and aggression. Participants also completed the hypothetical situations task in which they assessed the provocateur's intent and their own likely response in each. Intent and response statements were entered verbatim into separate electronic databases. Unaware of the study hypotheses, 3 male and 6 female undergraduates were trained to independently code the exhaustive lists of 170 different intents and 339 different responses. The coders were instructed to assign low scores to positive intents, moderate scores to ambiguous intents, and high scores to aggressive intents. Similarly, coders assigned low scores to positive responses, moderate scores to ambiguous responses, and high scores to aggressive responses. Intent and response scores across all four vignettes were averaged, yielding one score for hostile attribution bias and one for response generation. For Part 2 (Adolescent Data), participants included 184 adolescents who were between the ages of 14 and 17 and enrolled at a suburban high school in upstate New York. Adolescents were recruited to participate in a study of relationships and problem solving through announcements made by the researcher in the students' homeroom. A total of nine homerooms participated across two academic years. All participation was voluntary with the adolescents and a parent or legal guardian providing written consent. Adolescent participants completed all of the study materials in group testing sessions during their homeroom period. Participants were compensated with ten dollars cash for participating in the study. Each participating student's homeroom teacher completed an assessment regarding the student's behavior. The eight participating teachers were each provided a twenty dollar gift card to a bookstore and a book on child development. As in Part 1, intent and response statements were coded and assigned scores. The intent and response scores across all four vignettes were averaged, yielding one score for hostile attribution bias and one for response generation.

Sample:   For Part 1, participants included 125 male and female undergraduate students in upstate New York ranging in age from 18 to 27 years. For Part 2, participants included 184 adolescents between the ages of 14 and 17 who were enrolled in a suburban high school in upstate New York and 8 of their homeroom teachers.

Weight:   none

Mode of Data Collection:   on-site questionnaire

Description of Variables:   Part 1 (Older Adolescent Data) includes the demographic variables age, race, and gender and scores from the personality factors, justification of aggression, self-esteem, other-esteem, and aggression assessments and the hypothetical situations task. Part 2 (Adolescent Data) includes the demographic variables age, race, gender, ever lived in foster care, and ever arrested by police. Scores from the personality factors, justification of aggression, self-esteem, other-esteem, and aggression assessments and the hypothetical situations task are included. Part 2 also includes variables from the student's homeroom teacher assessing the student's behavior.

Response Rates:   The response rate for Part 1 is not available. For Part 2, the response rate was approximately 70 percent of all students recruited.

Presence of Common Scales:   Part 1: Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory (Rosenberg, 1965), Schema Assessment of Typicality (Burks, Laird, et al., 1999), Narcissistic Personality Inventory (Raskin & Terry, 1988), Emotional Empathy Questionnaire (Mehrabian & Epstein, 1972), Brief Symptom Inventory (Derogatis, 1993), and Barratt Impulsivity Scale (Barratt, 1994; Patton, Stanford, & Barrat, 1995). Part 2: Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (Armsden & Greenberg, 1987), Things I Have Seen and Heard Scale (Richters & Martinez, 1990), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965), Single Item Self-Esteem measure (Robins, Hendin, & Trzesniewski, 2001), Assessment of Schema Typically Scale (Burks, et al., 1999), Aggression Questionnaire (Buss & Perry, 1992), and Teacher's Report Form (Achenbach, 2001).

Extent of Processing:  ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Standardized missing values.

Version(s)

Original ICPSR Release:  

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