National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) Series

Investigator(s): Bureau of Justice Statistics

The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) series was designed to achieve three primary objectives: to develop detailed information about the victims and consequences of crime, to estimate the number and types of crimes not reported to police, and to provide uniform measures of selected types of crime.

All persons in the United States 12 years of age and older were interviewed in each household sampled. Each respondent was asked a series of screen questions to determine if he or she was victimized during the six-month period preceding the first day of the month of the interview. Screen questions cover the following types of crimes, including attempts: rape, robbery, assault, burglary, larceny, and motor vehicle theft.

The data include type of crime; severity of the crime; injuries or losses; time and place of occurrence; medical expenses incurred; number, age, race, and sex of offender(s); and relationship of offender(s) to the victim (stranger, casual acquaintance, relative, etc.). Demographic information on household members includes age, sex, race, education, employment, median family income, marital status, and military history. A stratified multistage cluster sample technique was employed, with the person-level files consisting of a full sample of victims and a 10 percent sample of nonvictims for up to four incidents.

The NCVS data are organized by collection quarter, and six quarters comprise an annual file. For example, for a 1979 file, the four quarters of 1979 are included as well as the first two quarters of 1980.

NACJD has prepared a resource guide on NCVS.

Years Produced: Updated annually

Online Analysis

Most Recent Studies

Related Publications

Most Recent Publications

2016
Clay-Warner, Jody,  Bunch, Jackson M.,  McMahon-Howard, Jennifer . Differential vulnerability: Disentangling the effects of state dependence and population heterogeneity on repeat victimization. Criminal Justice and Behavior.
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2016
Delden, Jayn von . Sex, gender, sexuality, and victimology. Sex, Sexuality, Law, and (In)justice. New York, NY: Routledge.
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2016
2016
Greenwood, Ian D. Cyber-Victimization and Delinquency: A General Strain Perspective. Thesis, University of Montana.
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2016
Hart, Timothy C.,  Troshynski, Emily I. Perceptions of stalking victimization among behaviorally defined victims: Examining factors that influence self-identification. The Wiley Handbook on the Psychology of Violence. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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2016
Khan, Rasib,  Hasan, Ragib . The story of naive alice: Behavioral analysis of susceptible internet users. 40th Annual Computer Software and Applications Conference. Atlanta, GA.
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2016
Lashley, Summer D. Decision-Making in a National Sample of Stalking Victims: A Quantitative Analysis. Dissertation, Capella University.
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2016
Mindrila, Diana,  Moore, Lori,  Davis, Pamela . Cyber-victimization and its psychosocial consequences: Relationships with behavior management and traditional bullying. Journal of Research in Education. 25, (2), 53-67.
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2016
Oudekerk, Barbara A.,  Morgan, Rachel E. Co-Offending Among Adolescents in Violent Victimizations, 2004-13. Special Report. NCJ 249756, Washington, DC: United States Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics.
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2016
Owens, Jennifer G. Why definitions matter: Stalking victimization in the United States. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. 31, (12), 2196-2226.
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